Wayne Davis News

Obama Visit Spotlights Sports Car Printed by UT Engineers

Shelby-Cobra

When President Obama takes the stage at Techmer PM in Clinton, Tennessee, on Friday to announce that UT will head a $259 million advanced manufacturing project and that Oak Ridge National Laboratory will play a key role, he will share the spotlight with a shiny example of innovation, research, and collaboration between the two.

White House Picks UT to Lead National Composites Manufacturing Institute

WhiteHouse

President Obama will announce today that UT will lead the Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation, or IACMI, a $259 million public-private partnership. The Institute reflects a $70 million commitment from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and $189 million from IACMI’s partners. Supported by the Department of Energy’s Advanced Manufacturing Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, IACMI joins four other institutes backed by the Obama administration in a recent push to accelerate advanced manufacturing.

College of Engineering Helps Kick Off Robot Season

Bearden High School's Patrick Woodworth, left, and Shea Payne look over their team's robot.

For many, the end of football season usually means attention turns to basketball, but for more than 400 budding scientists and engineers who came to UT on Saturday it marks the start of something else: robot season.

Engineers Day Brings Record Crowd, Competition, and NASA to The Hill

Lenoir City High School's Graham Denton describes the wind turbine that he and Rebecca Schuster built for an Engineers Day competition at UT.

The College of Engineering’s annual Engineers Day festivities brought a record-setting number high school students from around the state to The Hill on Thursday, where demonstrations, games, food, and fun served as the backdrop for a “getting to know you” session between the students from and the college.

Diversity Growth a Key Focus of College of Engineering

When Fred Peebles, dean of UT’s College of Engineering, hired Fred Brown to lead the newly created Minority Engineering Program in 1973, there were twenty-six total African American students in engineering. The program blossomed under Brown’s leadership and that of his successors, James Pippin and Travis Griffin, to the point that more than 1,000 minority engineers have now graduated.