Ut-ornl governor’s chairs News

UT-ORNL: Small Nanoparticles Have Surprisingly Big Effects on Polymer Nanocomposites

Polymer nanocomposites mix particles billionths of a meter (nanometers, nm) in diameter with polymers, which are long molecular chains. Often used to make injection-molded products, they are common in automobiles, fire retardants, packaging materials, drug-delivery systems, medical devices, coatings, adhesives, sensors, membranes and consumer goods. When a team of scientists, including UT’s Alexei Sokolov, tried to verify

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Titan Supercomputer Probes Depths of Biofuel’s Biggest Barrier

Ask a biofuel researcher to name the single greatest technical barrier to cost-effective ethanol, and you’re likely to receive a one-word response: lignin. To better understand exactly how lignin persists, researchers ORNL created one of the largest biomolecular simulations to date using the Titan supercomputer to track and analyze millions of atoms. The research was led by Jeremy Smith, UT Governor’s Chair based in the Department of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology.

Bacteria the Newest Tool in Detecting Environmental Damage

Terry Hazen, the Governor’s Chair for Environmental Biotechnology, a joint UT-ORNL appointment, is working with a team of researchers who have developed a method of using bacteria to help test for the presence of a wide array of pollutants.

ConstructionWeekOnline: SOM to design new Egyptian capital city

Philip Enquist, UT’s Governor’s Chair for High Performance Energy Practices in Urban Environments, will lead the design of Egypt’s new capital city. The news was featured in a recent article at ConstructionWeekOnline.com. Enquist and a team from his firm, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP, will design the $45 billion capital city to meet the needs of a modern

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Science Omega: Unexpected numbers of microbes are fighting nitrous oxide

Frank Loeffler, UT-ORNL Governor’s Chair for Microbiology, was featured in Science-Omega for his research involving nitrous oxide. Loeffler and his international team has discovered that the range of microorganisms which combat the greenhouse gas is broader than expected.