Steven Wilhelm News

Michigan Outlets Feature Study on Toledo Water Crisis

Public officials and scientists need a different way to monitor toxins from algae blooms so they can be detected quicker and before they spread through the water supply, according to a new UT study about the 2014 Toledo crisis that affected Monroe County.  Steven Wilhelm, professor in the Department of Microbiology, has been studying Lake Erie

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UT Study Shows Virus Infection May be Linked to Toledo Water Crisis

In August 2014, toxins from algal blooms in Lake Erie shut down the city of Toledo, Ohio’s water supply, leaving half a million residents without potable water for more than two days. A new study co-authored by UT researchers shows that a virus may have been involved in the crisis and suggests methods for more stringent monitoring of water supplies.

UT Scientists Discover New Hidden World of Giant Viruses in Seawater

An international team of researchers including UT faculty has discovered a hidden world of giant viruses within a teaspoon of seawater. The findings could help scientists directly examine the genetic potential of a virus without first having to grow it in a lab.

NIMBioS: Study Shows Large Variability in Abundance of Viruses That Infect Ocean Microorganisms

Viruses infect more than humans or plants. For microorganisms in the oceans—including those that capture half of the carbon taken out of the atmosphere every day—viruses are a major threat. But a paper published Monday in the journal Nature Microbiology shows that there’s much less certainty about the size of these viral populations than scientists had long believed.