Steven Wilhelm News

NIMBioS: Study Shows Large Variability in Abundance of Viruses That Infect Ocean Microorganisms

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Viruses infect more than humans or plants. For microorganisms in the oceans—including those that capture half of the carbon taken out of the atmosphere every day—viruses are a major threat. But a paper published Monday in the journal Nature Microbiology shows that there’s much less certainty about the size of these viral populations than scientists had long believed.

UT’s Wilhelm Named Fellow of Aquatic Science Organization

Steven Wilhelm

A prestigious aquatic science organization has appointed a UT microbiology professor Steven Wilhelm as one of its fellows. Wilhelm, Kenneth and Blaire Mossman Professor in the Department of Microbiology, is part of the inaugural class of sustaining fellows of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography.

Microbiology Professor Steven Wilhelm Appointed Mossman Professor

Steven Wilhelm

Steven Wilhelm, professor of microbiology, has been appointed Kenneth and Blaire Mossman Professor. The five-year appointment began August 1, 2014, and continues through the end of the 2018-19 academic year. The professorship in the College of Arts and Sciences was generously endowed in 2010 by alumni Kenneth and Blaire Mossman formerly of Scottsdale, Arizona.

Pregame Showcase: Microbiology Professor to Discuss Water Quality

Steven Wilhelm

Microbiology professor Steven Wilhelm will talk about water quality at Saturday’s Pregame Showcase, prior to the Vols football game against Missouri. His presentation, “Protecting Our Water Resources: A Microbiologist’s Perspective,” will examine the world’s declining water quality. It begins at 10:21 a.m. in the Carolyn P. Brown Memorial University Center.

Team Receives NSF Support to Study Toxic Water in China

Blue-green alga blooms in Lake Taihu

More than 12 million Chinese rely on Lake Taihu for drinking water but about twenty years ago the once pristine lake turned pea green. It had become overrun with toxic blue-green algae which can damage the liver, intestines and nervous system. Two UT researchers will be working on an international team funded by two new National Science Foundation awards totaling $2.5 million to resolve the ecosystem balance in the lake.