Sergey Gavrilets News

Gavrilets Elected Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

A leading theoretical evolutionary biologist at UT has been elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Sergey Gavrilets, distinguished professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Department of Mathematics, follows in the footsteps of historical greats such as Benjamin Franklin, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Mead, and Nelson Mandela, who were all notable members of the academy.

NIMBioS Study: Power of Shared Pain Triggers Extreme Self-Sacrifice

The extreme self-sacrificial behavior found in suicide bombers and soldiers presents an evolutionary puzzle: how can a trait that calls for an individual to make the ultimate sacrifice, especially in defense of a group of non-family members, persist over evolutionary time?

WUOT: UT’s Gavrilets Discusses Evolution of Human Warfare

Sergey Gavrilets recently spoke with WUOT 91.9 FM about human warfare and how it has evolved over time. Gavrilets, distinguished professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, is one of the organizers of a three-day workshop that will explore warfare in human societies and how it has potentially acted as a source of natural selection for biological and cultural evolution.

War May Have Made Us Smarter

Research by Sergey Gavrilets, professor of evolutionary biology and mathematics and associate director of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, has been featured on ABC News. Warfare not only hastened human technological progress and vast social and political changes, but may have greatly contributed to the evolutionary emergence of humans’ high intelligence and

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Prehistoric Conflict Hastened Human Brain’s Capacity for Collaboration, Study Says

Warfare not only hastened human technological progress and vast social and political changes, but may have greatly contributed to the evolutionary emergence of humans’ high intelligence and ability to work together toward common goals, according to a new study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.

UT Study Explains New Twist in Group Cooperation

A joint study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and the University of Oxford sheds new light on the evolutionary roots of group cooperation. Researchers say that leaders in group-living species may bully their own to get what they want, but they also bully outsiders for the overall betterment of their own group.

UT Professor Uses Math to Explain History

A study by Sergey Gavrilets, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and associate director for scientific activities at National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, has found that intense warfare is the evolutionary driver of large complex societies.