sergey Gavrilets News

WUOT: UT’s Gavrilets Discusses Evolution of Human Warfare

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Sergey Gavrilets recently spoke with WUOT 91.9 FM about human warfare and how it has evolved over time. Gavrilets, distinguished professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, is one of the organizers of a three-day workshop that will explore warfare in human societies and how it has potentially acted as a source of natural selection for biological and cultural evolution.

War May Have Made Us Smarter

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Research by Sergey Gavrilets, professor of evolutionary biology and mathematics and associate director of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, has been featured on ABC News. Warfare not only hastened human technological progress and vast social and political changes, but may have greatly contributed to the evolutionary emergence of humans’ high intelligence and

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Prehistoric Conflict Hastened Human Brain’s Capacity for Collaboration, Study Says

NIMBioS

Warfare not only hastened human technological progress and vast social and political changes, but may have greatly contributed to the evolutionary emergence of humans’ high intelligence and ability to work together toward common goals, according to a new study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.

UT Study Explains New Twist in Group Cooperation

High-rank individuals bully their group-mates to get what they want, but their contribution is key to success in conflict with other groups, according to a new study.

A joint study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and the University of Oxford sheds new light on the evolutionary roots of group cooperation. Researchers say that leaders in group-living species may bully their own to get what they want, but they also bully outsiders for the overall betterment of their own group.

UT Professor Uses Math to Explain History

A study by Sergey Gavrilets, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and associate director for scientific activities at National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, has found that intense warfare is the evolutionary driver of large complex societies.

Faculty News and Notes

Honors and awards for the university’s faculty and graduate students.

Study Finds Epigenetics May Underlie Homosexuality

Is homosexuality genetic? It’s a long-running debate. Now researchers at UT say they’ve found a clue that may unlock the mystery. It lies in something called epi-genetics—how gene expression is regulated by temporary switches. A working group at NIMBioS used mathematical modeling that found the transmission of sex-specific epi-marks may signal homosexuality.

UT, NIMBioS Study Finds Bullies Squelched When Bystanders Intervene

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A new national anti-bullying ad campaign urges parents to teach their kids to speak up if they witness bullying. One UT researcher has found that in humans’ evolutionary past, at least, helping the victim of a bully hastened our species’ movement toward a more egalitarian society.