Rosalind Hackett News

Author to Speak on “Dark Green” Nature Religion at UT

BronTaylor

Author and professor Bron Taylor will discuss how a multifaceted trend of “dark green” religion is becoming a global movement at UT’s fourth annual David L. Dungan Memorial Lecture on Thursday, February 20. Taylor’s lecture, “Spirituality After Darwin: ‘Dark Green’ Nature Religion as Global Religious Movement,” is presented by the Issues Committee and co-sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies.

Muslim Youth Minister Has Unique Position

As youth director for the Muslim Community of Knoxville, AbdelRahman Murphy is one of only four full-time salaried Muslim youth ministers in the country. He spends a good part of his time working with Muslim students at UT.

Human Rights Week to Feature Talk by Kofele-Kale

The UT Amnesty International chapter will celebrate its third annual Human Rights Week March 11 through 20 with speakers on issues ranging from due process rights in foreign lands to reproduction rights to prisoners wrongly sentenced on death row. The week will kick off with a lecture by Ndiva Kofele-Kale at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, March 11, in the University Center Ballroom. A former UT faculty member, Kofele-Kale is now a professor of public international law at Southern Methodist University. Kofele-Kale, who was born in Cameroon, is leading the defense team representing Marafa Hamidou Yaya, former Secretary General of the Presidency of Cameroon.

UT Mini-Summit to Focus on Photography, Poverty and Politics in the South and Abroad

“Baldwin Lee, James Agee and Walker Evans: Photography, Poverty, Politics in the South and Abroad” will be theme of a mini-summit to be held Feb. 4 and 11 at UT Knoxville. “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men,” by author James Agee and photographer Walker Evans, will be the used in various discussions on the first day. The second day will fast forward 50 years to the 1980s, with an exhibit and a presentation about photographs taken by UT Professor Baldwin Lee.

Jazz for Justice to Hold ‘Blood Diamond’ Conference, Benefit Concert Oct. 1-2

The Jazz for Justice Project will host a conference at UT Knoxville on the impact of resource mining in Africa and a benefit concert for the people of northern Uganda this week. The conference on extractive industries in Africa, titled “Blood Diamonds, Blood Phones and the Devil’s Gold: Africa’s Resource Curse,” will be held on Thursday, Oct. 1, from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Toyota Auditorium at the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy. The conference is free and open to the public.