Research News

NSF Funds Social Work, Engineering Collaboration to Fight Flooding

An interdisciplinary collaboration at UT is confronting storm-related flooding and runoff, an increasingly important topic highlighted by recent devastation in the wake of Hurricane Harvey and the looming threat of Hurricane Irma. The National Science Foundation is providing $1.8 million in funding for the College of Social Work and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering project.

UT Awarded Grant from Maddie’s Fund to Study Barriers to Veterinary Care Nationwide

Petting a dog's head

The Access to Veterinary Care Coalition is pleased to announce a $391,420 Maddie’s Fund grant to the College of Social Work. The grant will fund a nationwide study identifying barriers to veterinary care experienced by pet owners and veterinary services providers and document existing strategies to deliver veterinary care to underserved pet owners.

Chemical Engineering Professor Takes Aim at Diseases

Cong Trinh, an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, is developing a method to greatly improve the time involved in both identification and removal of pathogens through the concept of a Virulent Pathogen Resistance program.

Robert Nobles to Serve as Interim Vice Chancellor

Robert Nobles, associate vice chancellor for research, has been named interim vice chancellor for research and engagement effective September 1. Vice Chancellor Taylor Eighmy will leave the university at the end of the month to become president of the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Chancellor Recognizes Powe Awardees Jagadamma, McCord

UT’s Sindhu Jagadamma and Rachel Patton McCord are recipients of the 2017 Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award from Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). Chancellor Beverly Davenport recently presented plaques to Jagadamma, assistant professor of biosystems engineering and soil science, and McCord, assistant professor of biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology, in recognition of the honor.

Alderman to Study Role of Geography, Geospatial Intelligence During Civil Rights Era

During the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, activist groups used geography and geospatial intelligence—collecting geographic information and understanding its potential to effect change—to identify protest sites and plan protests. Derek Alderman, a UT professor of geography, has received a three-year $373,000 National Science Foundation grant to explore those geospatial tactics and determine what can be learned about patterns of racial inequality.

Study: Very Preterm Birth Not Associated with Mood, Anxiety Disorders

Do very-preterm or very-low-weight babies develop anxiety and mood disorders later in life? Julia Jaekel, assistant professor of child and family studies at UT, and Dieter Wolke, professor of psychology at the University of Warwick, co-authored a study to answer this question.