ORNL News

New Center Now Choosing Inaugural Class of Graduate Students

UT Knoxville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s new science and energy center has received program approval and named its first set of faculty members. The process for selecting its inaugural class of graduate students is now underway.

International Scientists Share Earth, Energy and Environmental Discoveries at UT-ORNL Conference

Can we stop climate change by pumping carbon into the Earth’s core? Could marine life on Earth be the key to discovering life on other planets? What did the world look like hundreds of millions of years ago? These are some questions that will be addressed at this year’s Goldschmidt Conference hosted by UT Knoxville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 13-18 at the Knoxville Convention Center in World’s Fair Park.

New ‘Doubly Magic’ Research Reveals Role of Nuclear Shell

Researchers at UT Knoxville, the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and six collaborating universities have performed an unprecedented nuclear reaction experiment that explores the unique properties of the “doubly magic” radioactive isotope of 132Sn, or tin-132.

Cheek: Spread the Word About UT Knoxville-ORNL Distinguished Fellowships

Last week we had the pleasure to announce the new UT Knoxville-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distinguished Fellowship. The program provides our campus with a groundbreaking opportunity to recruit top graduate students in the sciences. For the program to be successful in its first year, it is vital that we spread news of its creation far and wide, and we have a very short time frame in which to meet that goal.

UT Knoxville and ORNL Researchers Reveal Key To How Bacteria Clear Mercury Pollution

Mercury pollution is a persistent problem in the environment. Human activity has led to increasingly large accumulations of the toxic chemical, especially in waterways, where fish and shellfish tend to act as sponges for the heavy metal. It’s that persistent and toxic nature that has flummoxed scientists for years in the quest to find ways to mitigate the dangers posed by the buildup of mercury in its most toxic form, methylmercury. A new discovery by scientists at UT Knoxville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, however, has shed new light on one of nature’s best mercury fighters: bacteria.