NIMBioS News

UT Professor Tapped to Lead National STEM Education Effort

Lou Gross

Part of a national effort to advance science, technology, engineering, and mathematics undergraduate education is being directed by a UT professor. Three five-day National Science Foundation Ideas Labs —one for biology, one for engineering, and one for geosciences—are being held this month through April 4 in the Washington, D.C., area. Louis Gross, director of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT, will serve as director of the Biology Ideas Lab.

NIMBioS Names Associate Director of Postdoctoral Activities

The National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis welcomes Paul Armsworth as associate director for postdoctoral activities. Armsworth, an associate professor in ecology and evolutionary biology, has been affiliated with NIMBioS as one its senior personnel since 2009 when he was hired as an NIMBioS-affiliated faculty member at UT.

The New York Times: Algorithm Can Identify Dolphin Whistles

Work by researchers at National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT was featured in The New York Times. The work discovered a computer algorithm that is used to identify songs can also identify the signature whistles of bottlenose dolphins. Just as humans sound slightly different each time they sing a given song, a

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WVLT-TV: Flipper on Line 1? UT researchers closer to figuring out how dolphins talk

WVLT-TV featured research at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis which has developed a method to help decipher dolphin communications. The method focuses more on changes in pitch than frequency, so scientists could assign hundreds of signature whistles to over twenty individual dolphins. To read the whole story, visit WVLT’s website.  

Research Finds Method to Help Understand Dolphin Communications

The same algorithm used to find tunes in music retrieval systems has been successfully used to identify the signature whistles of dolphins, according to research done at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT.

Study Finds Climate Change Threatens Northern American Turtle Habitat

Although a turtle’s home may be on its back, some North American turtles face an uncertain future as a warming climate threatens to reduce their suitable habitat. A new study conducted at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT reconstructs the effects of past climate changes on fifty-nine species of North American turtles.

Research at UT May Improve Treatment of Acetaminophen Overdose Victims

Acetaminophen, or Tylenol, is commonly used in the United States to eliminate aches and pains and reduce fever with few side effects. However, the drug is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the United States, and if liver damage is severe enough, the only lifesaving treatment is a liver transplant. A novel method developed at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT helps determine which patients will benefit from transplantation.

UT Professor Uses Math to Explain History

A study by Sergey Gavrilets, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and associate director for scientific activities at National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, has found that intense warfare is the evolutionary driver of large complex societies.

LA Times: Scientists use math–and computer war games–to show how society evolved

A study by Sergey Gavrilets, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and associate director for scientific activities at National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, has received ample media attention worldwide. Using math to explain history, the study finds that intense warfare is the evolutionary driver of large complex societies. The study appears as an

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Tennessee High School Students’ Work at UT Published in Top Science Journal

Hayes Griffin (left) and Dalton Chaffee (right) present their award-winning research at the international meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology. Photo credit: NIMBioS

Tennessee high school students Dalton Chaffee and Hayes Griffin have now done what many scientists strive for: publishing their research in a top science journal. Chaffee and Griffin worked with mentor R. Tucker Gilman, a former postdoctoral research fellow at UT’s National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) to study mate choice. Their work was published this week in the journal Evolution.