NIMBioS News

NIMBioS Study Finds Saving Seeds the Right Way Can Save the World’s Plants

Conservationists establish one-size-fits-all seed collections to save the seeds in banks or botanical gardens in hopes of preserving some genetic diversity. But a National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis study has found that more careful tailoring of seed collections to specific species and situations is critical to preserving plant diversity.

Study Predicts Ranavirus as Potential New Culprit in Amphibian Extinctions

Wood frog tadpole hemorrhage from a die-off in Brunswick, Maine, in which it is estimated more than 200,000 tadpoles died in less than twenty-four hours due to ranavirus. Photo credit: Nathaniel Wheelwright

Amphibian declines and extinctions around the world have been linked to an emerging fungal disease called chytridiomycosis, but new research from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and the Center for Wildlife Health at UT shows that another pathogen, ranavirus, may also contribute.

UT, NIMBioS Research Sheds Light on Marine Viruses Role in Phosphorus Cycle

A study on marine viruses and their implication for marine biogeochemical cycles by a group of UT- and NIMBioS-associated researchers holds promise for further understanding the quantitative role that marine viruses play in the storage and recycling of dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus.

UT Conference to Look at How Women in STEM Can Thrive in Industry, Academia

Women comprise less than a quarter of the STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) workforce in the United States, and they are most likely to leave those jobs compared to men. A workshop to familiarize women in the mathematical sciences with professional opportunities in academics, industry, and government labs and help them thrive in mathematics-related fields, will be held April 9–11 at UT.

Wanted: UT’s NIMBioS Needs Scientists and Science Lovers to Analyze Howls

Scientists and citizen scientists are needed to help researchers at UT’s National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis analyze the howls of wolves, coyotes, dogs, and other canid species. NIMBioS brings together researchers from around the world to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to investigate solutions to basic and applied problems in the life sciences. For the Canid Howl Project, volunteers are needed to log in to a website, listen to howls, and plot them on a graph according to specific directions. Volunteers are also needed to donate their own recordings of howls from domestic dogs.

UT Study Explains New Twist in Group Cooperation

High-rank individuals bully their group-mates to get what they want, but their contribution is key to success in conflict with other groups, according to a new study.

A joint study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and the University of Oxford sheds new light on the evolutionary roots of group cooperation. Researchers say that leaders in group-living species may bully their own to get what they want, but they also bully outsiders for the overall betterment of their own group.

UT Professor Tapped to Lead National STEM Education Effort

Lou Gross

Part of a national effort to advance science, technology, engineering, and mathematics undergraduate education is being directed by a UT professor. Three five-day National Science Foundation Ideas Labs —one for biology, one for engineering, and one for geosciences—are being held this month through April 4 in the Washington, D.C., area. Louis Gross, director of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT, will serve as director of the Biology Ideas Lab.