nics News

NICS Supercomputer Helps Recreate Universe’s Evolution

This composite image from the Illustris simulation is centered on the most massive galaxy cluster existing today. Photo courtesy of Illustris Collaboration.

An international team of researchers used resources at UT’s National Institute for Computational Sciences to develop components that would serve as the basis for “Illustris,” the most ambitious simulation of galaxy formation ever done. Illustris allows one to journey back and see in high detail our universe twelve million years after the Big Bang and then watch the cosmos evolve over a period of 13.8 billion years.

Students Training for Computing Event

Some very computer-savvy UT and area high school students are training with UT faculty mentors for the Student Cluster Competition, which is part of the SC14 conference, the world’s largest high-performance computing event.

Supercomputer Research Sheds Light on the Death of Stars

Supernovae exhibit the most-energetic explosions, dispersing elements that make life possible into the universe. However, the energy source for the violent death of these massive stars is not known. Researchers using UT’s Kraken supercomputer have created three-dimensional simulations that have made great strides in uncovering the source.

Researchers Use Kraken to Understand Weather and Climate

NOAA-winter-storm

Severe weather raises questions about the phenomena that cause it. The answer to all questions is atmospheric conditions. The atmosphere consists of varying layers of gases or fluid structures. Researchers at the National Institute for Computational Sciences are using the supercomputing power of UT’s Kraken to model how the structures interact to help prepare accurate weather forecasts and climate predictions.

New Supercomputing Method Helps Energy and Materials Research

Research being done on the supercomputer Kraken holds promise for overcoming limitations in the study of energy and materials applications. The method employs quantum mechanics to understand how nuclear effects change the dynamics of microscopic-size materials.

Supercomputer Work Makes Stride in Biofuels Research

Cellulase enzymes found in nature from sources such as wood-degrading fungi or in cows’ stomach compartments form one of the key catalysts for breaking down plant biomass to make biofuels. But, they remain quite expensive. Compute allocations from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) have made a breakthrough possible that could have big cost implications.