National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis News

‘Doctor Bugs’ of the Smithsonian to Speak at UT October 11


A noted entomologist, nature photographer and explorer will speak at UT on Tuesday, October 11. Mark Moffett, also known as Doctor Bugs, will present a lecture exploring the connection between social identity and the evolution of societies. He is a research associate in entomology at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History.

Study: Tails Might Have Helped Vertebrates Evolve from Sea to Land


When early terrestrial animals began moving about on mud and sand 360 million years ago, the powerful tails they used as fish may have been more important than scientists previously realized. That’s one conclusion from a new study by a multidisciplinary team from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Clemson University, Carnegie Mellon University and the UT-based National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.

UT researchers trying to stop the spread of canine distemper


WVLT Local 8 Now featured students and faculty at UT who are investigating ways to stop the spread of canine distemper, a devastating disease affecting dogs—particularly those in animal shelters. The team, part of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, is using math models to study how the disease spreads through a shelter once the

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NIMBioS Study: Warming Could Cause Great Loss of Great Barrier Reef Corals


The coverage of living corals on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef could decline to less than ten percent if ocean warming continues, according to a new study that explores the short- and long-term consequences of environmental changes to the reef. The study was done by an international team of ecologists at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT.

New Textbook Introduces Undergraduates to Mathematics for the Life Sciences


Today’s students now have a new textbook, Mathematics for the Life Sciences, published this month by Princeton Press and co-authored by scientists at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT. It teaches readers about basic mathematical and statistical methods that can be used to explore and explain biological phenomena.

Study Offers Clues to How Plants Evolved to Cope with Cold

Researchers at UT have found new clues to how plants evolved to withstand wintry weather. The study suggests that many plants acquired characteristics that helped them thrive in colder climates—such as dying back to the roots in winter—long before they first encountered freezing.