National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis News

Gross Named Fellow of Society for Mathematical Biology

Louis J. Gross has been named a Fellow in the inaugural class of Fellows of the Society for Mathematical Biology. A distinguished UT professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and mathematics, Gross is also the founding and current director of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) and director of UT’s Institute for Environmental Modeling.

NIMBioS: Mathematical Biology Tackles Destructive Plant Virus

Plant diseases pose a serious threat to global food security, especially in developing countries, where millions of people depend on consuming what they harvest. In sub-Saharan Africa, one plant disease in particular – maize lethal necrosis – is ravaging one of the region’s preferred crops for food, feed and income. A team of researchers at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS), based at UT, has used mathematical modeling to better understand the dynamics of the disease and how to manage it.

New Test Detects Early Stage of Wasting Disease in Cattle

NIMBioS researchers have identified a more sensitive test for detecting the early stages of paratuberculosis, a fatal disease that plagues dairy and beef herds and causes an estimated annual loss of up to $250 million to the US dairy industry.

NIMBioS Study: Power of Shared Pain Triggers Extreme Self-Sacrifice

The extreme self-sacrificial behavior found in suicide bombers and soldiers presents an evolutionary puzzle: how can a trait that calls for an individual to make the ultimate sacrifice, especially in defense of a group of non-family members, persist over evolutionary time?

NIMBioS Study: Male Pipefish Pregnancy, It’s Complicated

NIMBioS

In the upside-down world of the pipefish, sexual selection appears to work in reverse, with flashy females battling for males who bear the pregnancy and carry their young to term in their brood pouch. But new research from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) shows even more factors appear to play a role in determining mating success.

NIMBioS Study: Human Groups Key to Preserving Natural Resources

Learning between human social groups may be key to sustaining the environment, according to a new study that uses mathematical modeling to understand what factors most influence societies to conserve natural resources. Researchers at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS), based at UT, conducted the research.