National Institute for Computational Sciences News

Supercomputer Work Makes Stride in Biofuels Research

Cellulase enzymes found in nature from sources such as wood-degrading fungi or in cows’ stomach compartments form one of the key catalysts for breaking down plant biomass to make biofuels. But, they remain quite expensive. Compute allocations from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) have made a breakthrough possible that could have big cost implications.

Supercomputing Research to Help Make Recommendations University Library Users

Researchers using the supercomputing resources at the National Institute for Computational Sciences are investigating a way to recommend sources for users at university libraries. The result would be similar to the “recommender system” at which prioritizes descriptive information based on social behavior.

Researchers Use Supercomputing Power to Simulate Supercell Thunderstorms

Tornado forecasting remains a persistent challenge. Researchers using supercomputers at the National Institute for Computational Sciences are trying to change this. Modest hardware enables researchers to simulate a supercell, said the researchers, but supercomputers can run at a high enough resolution to properly capture tiny features associated with the tornado itself.

Researchers Use Supercomputer to Map the Earth’s Magnetosphere to Predict and Prepare for Space Weather Events

The Earth has a shield which can protect it from damaging solar particles. However, this shield can be infiltrated and the result can be a disruption of power grids and communications networks, and radiation on Earth. Researchers using supercomputers at the National Institute for Computational Sciences are creating a topological map of Earth’s magnetosphere, allowing them to closely study how space weather affects our magnetosphere.

NICS Project Aims to Piece Together Pathology Puzzle

As disease progresses over space and time in the body, high-resolution imaging can capture the changes taking place down to the sub-cellular level; meanwhile, huge sets of hereditary (genomic) information hold clues about the dynamics of illness. Comparing certain characteristics in the images with genomic and clinical data may be key in predicting disease progression and in targeting new treatments. The current work of a research team at UT’s National Institute for Computational Sciences revolves around making those very connections.

Supercomputing Research Studies if Marine Crustacean Enzyme Can Be Used in Biofuels

Tiny, wood-boring marine crustaceans with a funny name and a penchant for collectively attacking piers and dining on driftwood, ships, boats, and docks have made a big splash in the science news media lately. These creatures, called Gribbles, have as their recent claim to fame a novel biomass-degrading enzyme in their guts that is of keen interest to the biofuels research and engineering communities.

Supercomputing Research Shows Black Holes Impact Galaxies

Using supercomputing resources provided by the National Institute for Computational Sciences, a research team has made discoveries using computer modeling and simulations that have overturned longstanding, widely held beliefs about black holes.

Virtual School of Computational Science and Engineering Offers Summer Classes

Graduate students, post-docs and professionals from academia, government and industry are invited to enroll in two summer school courses offered by the Virtual School of Computational Science and Engineering and presented at the University of Tennessee Knoxville and other sites across the country during July and August.

Supercomputer Research to Revolutionize Tornado Prediction

During peak tornado season, researchers using supercomputers at the National Institute for Computational Sciences are working to revolutionize the ability to anticipate tornadoes by explaining why some storms generate tornadoes and others don’t. They are also developing advanced techniques for analyzing data to discover how the twisters move in both space and time.

Research Group at NICS Tackling Turbulence Puzzle

Smoke flowing out of a chimney, the wind moving between the leaves and branches of trees, massive clouds moving in the atmosphere—turbulence is everywhere. However, it has remained one of the biggest puzzles in classical physics. A research group is using supercomputing power at the National Institute for Computation Sciences to solve the puzzle and tackle turbulent flow problems.