Lee Murphy News

Professor Dishes Up Healthy Holiday Hacks

Holiday table

There are many delicious temptations during the holidays, but UT nutrition professor Lee Murphy says there’s always room to hack your favorite recipe in order to reduce calories from added fats and sugars.

Three Positive Nutrition Tips for Healthy Eating in the New Year

“Stop worrying about things not to eat and focus on a positive mindset of what you should eat.” That’s some New Year’s resolution advice from Lee Murphy, professor of nutrition. “People often think of resolutions as eating less of something or cutting it out altogether, but I think it’s more fun and realistic to try and think positively about food,” she said.

WBIR: Murphy Provides Tips for Staying Healthy During Holidays

WBIR featured Lee Murphy, assistant professor of nutrition in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences, during its Live at Five at Four segment. Murphy provided tips for staying healthy during the holidays. Some of Murphy’s tips are: Stay hydrated! Keep fruits and vegetables on your radar. Try to have at least five a day. Incorporate dietary

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Six Tips to Keep Your Family Fit and Healthy This Summer

Summer is a great time to kick-start healthy habits but finding time to stay fit and make healthy choices as a family can seem overwhelming. “Summer is a great time for families to be active and make nutrition a priority,” said Lee Murphy, UT professor of nutrition. “These six steps can make a big difference for families who want to create or maintain a healthy lifestyle.”

Nutrition Expert Recommends Superfoods for Healthy Resolutions

It’s a week into 2016, and your New Year’s resolution to eat healthier may already be going sour. But it’s a sweet goal, and one easy way to make progress is to add a few “superfoods” into your diet, according to Lee Murphy, professor of nutrition at UT.

Pumpkin Pie v. Pilates: UT Expert Puts Holiday Meal to the Workout Test

The Thanksgiving table is set with the traditional fare—roast turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, sweet potato casserole, cranberry sauce, rolls, and pumpkin pie. It’s a feast meant to be enjoyed. But if you’re tempted to overindulge, beware: an average Thanksgiving meal contains upwards of 2,000 calories. Before you spoon up that second serving

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