Kraken News

Supercomputer Research Sheds Light on the Death of Stars

Supernovae exhibit the most-energetic explosions, dispersing elements that make life possible into the universe. However, the energy source for the violent death of these massive stars is not known. Researchers using UT’s Kraken supercomputer have created three-dimensional simulations that have made great strides in uncovering the source.

Researchers Use Kraken to Understand Weather and Climate

NOAA-winter-storm

Severe weather raises questions about the phenomena that cause it. The answer to all questions is atmospheric conditions. The atmosphere consists of varying layers of gases or fluid structures. Researchers at the National Institute for Computational Sciences are using the supercomputing power of UT’s Kraken to model how the structures interact to help prepare accurate weather forecasts and climate predictions.

New Supercomputing Method Helps Energy and Materials Research

Research being done on the supercomputer Kraken holds promise for overcoming limitations in the study of energy and materials applications. The method employs quantum mechanics to understand how nuclear effects change the dynamics of microscopic-size materials.

Supercomputer Research Helps Understand Planet-forming Gases

Many newly formed stars are surrounded by what are called protoplanetary disks, swirling masses of warm dust and gas that may potentially become celestial bodies such as planets and asteroids. Researchers are using the supercomputing power of Kraken to understand how these gases make this transformation.

Supercomputer Research Investigates Roles of Proteins in Disease

Proteins can play either pernicious or positive roles in the dynamics of disease. Some proteins that anchor to cell membranes promote the development of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), while some proteins thwart the growth of cancer, for example.

UT Faculty Research Why Drugs Work on Some and Not Others

Two UT biochemistry, cellular, and molecular biology faculty members may have uncovered why some people respond to drugs differently. Jerome Baudry and Yinglong Miao, joint faculty at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, used supercomputer simulations at ORNL to give them unprecedented access to a key class of proteins involved in drug detoxification.

UT Supercomputers to Gain More Power Thanks to NSF Grants

UT Knoxville’s supercomputing capabilities are about to become more powerful. The UT-managed National Institute for Computational Sciences is adding 300 teraflops to the TeraGrid’s total computational capability thanks to two awards from the National Science Foundation which total $3.4 million.

UT’s Kraken Named World’s Third Most Powerful Computer, ORNL’s Jaguar No. 1

East Tennessee is now home to two of the world’s three fastest computers, according to new rankings released today. The Top500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers places UT supercomputer Kraken in third place, where it also holds the title of world’s fastest academic supercomputer, while ORNL’s Jaguar computer took first place overall.