Karen Lloyd News

Faculty Member Continues Research Project with New Jersey Youth

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UT faculty member Andrew Steen will travel to Pennsylvania this month to continue a research project that allows inner-city New Jersey teens to experience hands-on science. This is the third year of the project, which started when Steen learned from a friend—Patrick Murray, a teacher at Malcolm X Shabazz High School in Newark, New Jersey—about

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Karen Lloyd Receives Prestigious Award for Ocean Science Work

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Karen Lloyd’s work with subsea floor mud and frozen Siberian soil has earned her an extraordinarily competitive award. The assistant professor of microbiology at UT has been selected as a 2015 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Ocean Sciences.

Cross-Country Science: UT Faculty Mentor Inner-City New Jersey Youth

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When faculty members Karen Lloyd and Andrew Steen saw an opportunity to introduce a group of inner-city New Jersey high school students to science, they made it happen. Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, and her husband, Steen, an assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences, just completed their second summer program with students and teachers from Malcolm X Shabazz High School in Newark.

The Engineer: Top Five Discoveries in Denmark

A study led by Karen Lloyd, assistant professor of microbiology, has been listed as one of the top five research discoveries in Denmark by Ingenioren, which translates to “The Engineer.” The study, published in Nature, reveals that these microscopic life-forms called archaea slowly eat tiny bits of protein. To view the article, visit  the Ingenioren

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Professor Discovers How Microbes Survive at Bare Minimum

Image of archaea. Image Courtesy: Richard Kevorkian, University of Tennessee.

Beneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and sunlight. Yet microbes have thrived in this environment for millions of years. A study led by Karen Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, reveals that these microscopic life-forms called archaea slowly eat tiny bits of protein. The study was released today in Nature.