Institute of Agriculture News

UT Team Receives Grant to Address Deadly Bat Disease

A UT team has received a federal grant to help combat a deadly disease affecting bats. The grant will be used to explore how the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome affects Southeastern bats during hibernation.

Institute of Agriculture Announces All Vol Cheese for Sale

The College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources is introducing a product line called All Vol Cheese that will soon be available for purchase. Four flavors are offered—Checkerboard Mild Cheddar, Game Day Sharp Cheddar, Smokey’s Smoked Gouda and Torchbearer Jalapeño. All Vol Cheese will debut at Ag Day on the Institute of Agriculture campus at 3:00 p.m. Saturday, October 3.

Bob Trigiano Named UTIA Institute Professor

Trigiano web

The Institute of Agriculture has named Bob Trigiano the Institute Professor of 2015. The title is given annually to faculty members who demonstrate high achievement in teaching, research, and service. Trigiano is a professor in the university’s entomology andplant pathology department.

Institute of Agriculture Presents Top Faculty and Staff Awards for 2015

The Institute of Agriculture recently honored some of its top faculty, staff, researchers, and outreach experts with a number of prestigious awards. More than thirty people were recognized with a variety of honors—many gifts sponsored by past faculty, alumni, and friends of the Institute.

Partnerships That Make a Difference: Agricultural Field Work with International Partners


International field work provides a platform for faculty and students to engage in cutting-edge research on global challenges integral to our agricultural and food systems, as well as experiential learning opportunities throughout the world that often combine academic activities with hands-on engagement during the summer, mini-term, an entire semester or academic year.

Professor Publishes First Book on Emerging Pathogen Ranavirus

Thousands of dead wood frog tadpoles associated with a ranavirus die-off in Maine (photo credit, Nathaniel Wheelwright)

A genus of emerging pathogens Ranavirus is thought to be the potential new culprit causing the decline and extinction of amphibians around the world. A new book by a UT professor provides insight on the viruses and guidance on urgent research directions to address them.

UT Knoxville and Institute of Agriculture Earn Carnegie-Engaged Designation


UT Knoxville and the UT Institute of Agriculture have earned the 2015 Carnegie Community Engagement Classification for collaborating with community partners to address society’s most pressing needs. The prestigious Carnegie engagement classification recognizes colleges’ and universities’ commitments to strengthening the bond between campus and community. UT joins a group of fifty-two universities with the “very high intensity” research classification and the engaged status designation. Fewer than half of the universities in Carnegie’s “very high intensity” research classification have achieved engaged status.

Birds May Have Sensed Severe Storms Days in Advance


Numerous media outlets including National Geographic, the BBC, and Newsweek featured a study by researchers within the Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries that found that gold-winged warblers detected a deadly storm and flew south—an ability never before documented in birds. The study is published in the academic journal Current Biology.

UT researchers create kit to detect disease


WATE-TV‘s Lori Tucker talked with Jayne Wu, associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering in the College of Engineering, and Shigetoshi Eda, associate professor in the Institute of Agriculture Center for Wildlife Health within the Department of Forestry, about their development of an innovative disease detection technology. The technology is closer to mass production.

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