Institute of Agriculture News

Partnerships That Make a Difference: Agricultural Field Work with International Partners

agfieldwork

International field work provides a platform for faculty and students to engage in cutting-edge research on global challenges integral to our agricultural and food systems, as well as experiential learning opportunities throughout the world that often combine academic activities with hands-on engagement during the summer, mini-term, an entire semester or academic year.

Professor Publishes First Book on Emerging Pathogen Ranavirus

Thousands of dead wood frog tadpoles associated with a ranavirus die-off in Maine (photo credit, Nathaniel Wheelwright)

A genus of emerging pathogens Ranavirus is thought to be the potential new culprit causing the decline and extinction of amphibians around the world. A new book by a UT professor provides insight on the viruses and guidance on urgent research directions to address them.

UT Knoxville and Institute of Agriculture Earn Carnegie-Engaged Designation

Carnegie-seal

UT Knoxville and the UT Institute of Agriculture have earned the 2015 Carnegie Community Engagement Classification for collaborating with community partners to address society’s most pressing needs. The prestigious Carnegie engagement classification recognizes colleges’ and universities’ commitments to strengthening the bond between campus and community. UT joins a group of fifty-two universities with the “very high intensity” research classification and the engaged status designation. Fewer than half of the universities in Carnegie’s “very high intensity” research classification have achieved engaged status.

Birds May Have Sensed Severe Storms Days in Advance

NationalGeographic

Numerous media outlets including National Geographic, the BBC, and Newsweek featured a study by researchers within the Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries that found that gold-winged warblers detected a deadly storm and flew south—an ability never before documented in birds. The study is published in the academic journal Current Biology.

UT researchers create kit to detect disease

WATE_Logo_YellowBack

WATE-TV‘s Lori Tucker talked with Jayne Wu, associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering in the College of Engineering, and Shigetoshi Eda, associate professor in the Institute of Agriculture Center for Wildlife Health within the Department of Forestry, about their development of an innovative disease detection technology. The technology is closer to mass production.

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Trees: Nature’s Water Filter? UT Study Hopes to Prove So

Jon Hathaway

For their ideas in answering a challenge issued by the US Department of Agriculture, a team lead by UT was recently awarded a federal grant of more than $200,000. The project, “Storm Water Goes Green: Investigating the Benefit and Health of Urban Trees in Green Infrastructure Installations,” is a multidisciplinary effort coordinated with North Carolina State University to study the impact of trees on storm water management.