Forensic Anthropology Center News

Community Celebrates Three Decades of UT Forensic Anthropology

Community members got a firsthand look at the work of UT forensic anthropologists during an open house on Sunday, October 1. More than 250 visitors—including children, families of donors, and pre-donors who will give their body to the center upon their death—took part in the event, which was hosted by the UT Forensic Anthropology Center.

The New Yorker: The Historian Making Science Come Alive

The New Yorker recently told the story of Christopher Gray, an architectural historian who passed away this month at the age of 66 and wanted to give his body back to science. UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center is making that happen.

Forensic Anthropology Center Celebrates 30th Anniversary

For three decades—long before the popularity of the CSI television series—the Forensic Anthropology Center has been on the forefront of forensic anthropology, turning out research and training law enforcement to solve crimes and identify the remains of unknown individuals.

Suspense Author to Graduate from UT Forensic Odontology Program

Alana Joy Scudiere has written about crimes and mysteries for years, but she will soon have a hand in solving them. A published suspense novelist, she is one of the first three graduates of the University of Tennessee’s Forensic Human Identification program.

Jantz Featured in CNN, USA Today, Huffington Post about New Amelia Earhart Theory

For decades, many have assumed that legendary American pilot Amelia Earhart died in a plane crash. Researchers believe they have new evidence that supports the theory that she may have died as a castaway on a remote island. Richard Jantz, professor emeritus of anthropology, reviewed measurements of bones that may have belonged to Earhart.