Forensic Anthropology Center News

Science Magazine: Researchers isolate the ‘human smell of death’


Science magazine recently featured UT’s Anthropology Research Facility commonly known as the “Body Farm,” and Arpad Vass, a research scientist with UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center, in this story about the singular chemical cocktail decomposing humans release, which scientists might be able to use to better train cadaver dogs and develop machines that could do the same job.

NPR: If These Bones Could Talk: The Stories Human Skeletons Can Tell

National Public Radio featured the Bass Donated Skeletal Collection and Dawnie Steadman, director of UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center, in this story. The donated collection contains 1,200 skeletons; it’s a draw for anthropologists, detectives and demographers who come to UT to learn how to read these bones.

In the News: Anthropology Research Facility’s Outdoor Recovery Course

Twenty-four law enforcement personnel from thirteen agencies across the United States are taking part in a five-day outdoor recovery course this week at the Anthropology Research Facility. They are recovering human remains and learning how to obtain evidence from decomposed and buried bodies. The training will better prepare them for the range and variation of homicide scenes

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Partnerships That Make a Difference: Forensic Anthropology Center


This week’s featured partnership is the Forensic Anthropology Center, which offers training to law enforcement, as well as assistance with identification of remains, at the world’s first natural outdoor lab developed for forensic studies. Center members also work on international recovery efforts and teach in the National Forensic Academy, a training program in evidence identification, collection, and preservation.

Local Memphis: Local Attorney Wants To Reopen 75-Year-Old Cold Case

Local Memphis this week highlighted the story of a retired West Tennessee attorney who has been investigating the cold case of the first NAACP member killed in the United States fighting for civil rights. Jim Emison turned to UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center, also known as the Body Farm, last year for help in finding Elbert Williams’ body. The

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WDBJ 7: Lexington woman has personal ties to the Body Farm

Roanoke, Virginia-based television station WDBJ 7 recently featured a story about a woman who has ties to UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center, also known as the Body Farm. The woman’s mother donated her body to help further the center’s research. Read and watch the story here.

Gizmodo: The Science Behind Dogs That Detect Dead Bodies

Gizmodo recently highlighted two studies conducted at UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center–also known as the Body Farm–that discuss the chemical vapors and compounds produced by the body during decomposition. Read the story here.