Department of Psychology News

Lewis is the Quest Scholar of the Week

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Jioni Lewis, assistant professor of psychology, was recently named the recipient of the nationally competitive 2015 Carolyn Payton Early Career Professional Award from Division 35 of the American Psychological Association. Quest, the campus’s comprehensive research initiative, has selected Lewis as its Scholar of the Week.

Gordon Talks to MPR About Infidelity

Kristina Coop Gordon, a UT psychology professor who specializes in the study and treatment of relationship dysfunction, was interviewed by Minnesota Public Radio on whether views on infidelity are changing in relation to the recent hacking of the Ashley Madison website.

UK Daily Mail: Now That’s Crocodile Rock!

The UK Daily Mail featured Vladimir Dinets, research assistant professor of psychology, in a story about predatory reptiles like crocodiles and alligators that sing to each other like birds do. The publication highlighted Dinets’ research that shows crocodiles and alligators have a talent for climbing trees. He observed crocodile species climbing trees on three continents–Australia, Africa

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BBC: Is the Himalayan Yeti a Real Animal?

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The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) recently featured Vladimir Dinets, assistant research professor in the Department of Psychology, in a story about the Yeti, a mythical creature described as an enormous, shaggy ape-man with huge feet and aggressive sabre-like teeth. Scientists suggest various theories about what the creature is, ranging from a bear to an ape. “There are

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Another World-Renowned Scientist Joins Neuroscience Program

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World-renowned neuroscientist Subimal Datta joined the faculty this spring. He comes to UT from the Boston University School of Medicine, where he was a professor of psychiatry, neurology, and behavioral neuroscience and director for the Sleep and Cognitive Neuroscience Research Laboratory.

UT Study: Crocodiles Just Wanna Have Fun, Too

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Turns out we may have more in common with crocodiles than we’d ever dream. According to research by a UT psychology professor, crocodiles think surfing waves, playing ball, and going on piggyback rides are fun, too.