Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering News

Going the Extra Mile: College of Engineering Spotlights Irick, Melcher

From June 1-12, 2014, teams gathered for the EcoCAR 2 Year Three Competition at the General Motors Milford Proving Grounds in Milford, Michigan and at locations throughout Washington, DC to compete in more than a dozen technical, communications, and business events. Throughout the ten days, vehicles participate in engineering test similar to those conducted by the automotive industry to determine a prototype's readiness for production, and ultimately prove the viability of their advanced technology vehicles.

Butch Irick, a research assistant professor of mechanical engineering, has been in the driver’s seat as hybrid vehicle technology has moved from experimental to commonplace. Chuck Melcher, director of the Scintillation Materials Research Center, is conducting research that has applications in fighting both terrorism and cancer.

Astronaut Kelly Honored by Magazine as Scientist of the Year

Scott Kelly featiured

Astronaut Scott Kelly is no stranger to stardom, having rocketed to fame as the first American to spend a year in space. In fact, by the time he returns to Earth in March, he will have spent more than 500 days total in orbit, a record for any American and trailing only a small number of cosmonauts. For that service, R&D Magazine has recognized Kelly, a graduate of the University of Tennessee Space Institute, as its 2015 Scientist of the Year.

Paper Chase: Hu Looks to Inexpensive Material for Life-saving Technologies

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Patients and health care professionals rely on portable diagnostic tests to measure blood glucose levels, monitor heart rates, and predict epileptic seizures. Ideally, these devices lower health care costs by providing convenient at-home care, but the manufacturing costs of these tools must be lowered to make them widely available. That’s why Anming Hu, assistant professor of mechanical, aerospace, and biomedical engineering, set out to create a way to produce electronic circuitry using an inexpensive, abundant material: paper.