Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering News

Former Chancellor, Astronaut in Inaugural MABE Hall of Fame at UT

MABE

In 1847, a course offering studies in mechanical philosophies and mechanics appeared at what was then East Tennessee University. Now, almost 170 years later, the school is UT, and the course has grown into the College of Engineering’s Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering, two-thirds of which would have been considered science fiction to those many years ago.

UT Engineers Make Key Finding in Cerebral Palsy Research

The possible detrimental effects on balance following a surgical procedure performed on many children with cerebral palsy is being better understood thanks to research conducted in part by a UT doctoral student.

Circuits on Demand: Engineer Prints Electrical Components on Paper

Anming Hu

One of humankind’s biggest technological steps was the ability to print words on paper. Now, thanks to UT College of Engineering assistant professor Anming Hu, it’s technology itself that is being printed. Hu, of the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering, has researched a way to print circuits on paper, the main impact of which could be a decrease in cost and an increase in portability for any number of devices.

UT Astronaut Arrives at International Space Station

The crew of the International Space Station, including UT alumnus Butch Wilmore (in blue flight suit with U.S. flag) gives an interview to Russian media in this image from NASA.

NASA astronaut Butch Wilmore and his Russian cosmonaut counterparts arrived at the International Space Station early Friday morning in their Soyuz capsule, beginning a six-month stint aboard the station.
Wilmore, who graduated from the University of Tennessee Space Institute with a master’s degree in aviation systems in 1994, will serve as the next commander of the space station, beginning when the current crew returns to earth in early November.

Students Benefit From College of Engineering’s British Connection

Students from the College of Engineering listen to a talk at Bletchley Park in England, where British code breakers cracked German communications during World War II.

Educational trips have long been a part of schooling, but few journeys into the field go as far as a recent one by members of the College of Engineering. Professors Roger Parsons, of the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering, and Michael Berry, of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, led a group of budding UT engineers for a few weeks of study and work in the United Kingdom.

Eastman Committing $2 Million to College of Engineering

Print

The College of Engineering and Eastman Chemical Company have announced plans to provide for three new professor of practice positions, improve and renovate lab space and construct a new student lounge. Taking all areas into account, Eastman’s support for the college will total $2 million over a five-year period.