Department of Materials Science and Engineering News

Materials Camp Offers Students Chance to Take on Investigator’s Role

Whodunnit? Or rather, how’d they do it? That will be the question students will be trying to answer next week when the Department of Materials Science and Engineering welcomes budding detectives to its annual Materials Camp. Reading like an episode of TV’s “CSI,” the camp will give high school students a chance to solve various clues to the identity of an unknown perpetrator based on the use of a wide array of techniques and tools used by materials scientists.

Smaller, Flexible Tablets and TVs Possible Thanks in Part to UT Researchers

Researchers from UT recently garnered national attention for their part in a study that could lead to the development of tablets, TVs, and mobile devices the width of a piece of paper. First published in Nature, the article details how researchers have been able to create wires only three atoms wide using an electron beam.

UT, ORNL Part of Breakthrough Reducing Size of LEDs

University of Washington scientists have built the thinnest-known LED that can be used as a source of light energy in electronics, thanks in part to a breakthrough by University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers. The LED is based off of two-dimensional, flexible semiconductors, making it possible to stack or use in much smaller and more diverse applications than current technology allows.

UT Names Nuclear Materials Expert as Thirteenth Governor’s Chair

Steve Zinkle, an authority on the effect of radiation on materials in fission and fusion nuclear reactors, has been named the thirteenth University of Tennessee-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair. Zinkle will serve as Governor’s Chair for Nuclear Materials, based in the department of nuclear engineering at UT with a complementary appointment in materials science and engineering. He begins at UT on October 1.

Professor Receives Funding for Clean Coal Research

Peter Liaw

About 40 percent of energy in the US is produced by coal. Yet this power leaves behind the largest carbon footprint. A professor in the College of Engineering has received funds from the U.S. Department of Energy to help change that. Professor Peter Liaw and colleagues have received a $300,000 Clean Coal Research Award for Improved Structural Materials.

Engineering Appoints New Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs

Veerle Keppens

Veerle Keppens, associate professor and associate head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, has been named associate dean for faculty affairs in the College of Engineering. She will be the first female senior administrator in the college’s history.

UT Receives $1.7 Million to Train Nuclear Leaders and Conduct Research

Nuclear Energy University Programs

UT Knoxville is receiving more than $1.7 million from the US Department of Energy for scholarships, a fellowship, and research grants to train and educate the next generation of leaders in America’s nuclear industry. The awards are part of the Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy University Program and Integrated University Program that will support research and development and student investment at forty-six colleges and universities.