Department of Materials Science and Engineering News

Journal Highlights UT Lab, ORNL Connections

The journal Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research includes a story highlighting the work of several members of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and UT’s relationship with ORNL.

Power Play: Mandrus Helping Shape Future of Modern World

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Professor David Mandrus has his own spin on the future. Mandrus recently was chosen by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation as a Moore Synthesis Investigator, a highly selective honor that carries with it $1.7 million in funding.

UT’s Rawn Earns Top Honor in Field of Materials Science

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College of Engineering associate professor Claudia Rawn has been named a 2014 ASM International Fellow, earning one of the highest honors attainable in her field. She is the third member of the department to be honored in the last seven years.

Materials Camp Offers Students Chance to Take on Investigator’s Role

Whodunnit? Or rather, how’d they do it? That will be the question students will be trying to answer next week when the Department of Materials Science and Engineering welcomes budding detectives to its annual Materials Camp. Reading like an episode of TV’s “CSI,” the camp will give high school students a chance to solve various clues to the identity of an unknown perpetrator based on the use of a wide array of techniques and tools used by materials scientists.

Smaller, Flexible Tablets and TVs Possible Thanks in Part to UT Researchers

Researchers from UT recently garnered national attention for their part in a study that could lead to the development of tablets, TVs, and mobile devices the width of a piece of paper. First published in Nature, the article details how researchers have been able to create wires only three atoms wide using an electron beam.

UT, ORNL Part of Breakthrough Reducing Size of LEDs

University of Washington scientists have built the thinnest-known LED that can be used as a source of light energy in electronics, thanks in part to a breakthrough by University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers. The LED is based off of two-dimensional, flexible semiconductors, making it possible to stack or use in much smaller and more diverse applications than current technology allows.

UT Names Nuclear Materials Expert as Thirteenth Governor’s Chair

Steve Zinkle, an authority on the effect of radiation on materials in fission and fusion nuclear reactors, has been named the thirteenth University of Tennessee-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair. Zinkle will serve as Governor’s Chair for Nuclear Materials, based in the department of nuclear engineering at UT with a complementary appointment in materials science and engineering. He begins at UT on October 1.