Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering News

Center for Transportation Research Names 2016 Fellows

The Center for Transportation Research at UT has established itself as a go-to source for information, research, and expertise in all areas of transportation. Recently, the CTR established its Faculty Fellows program to recognize some of the people who have helped advance that work. Now in its third year, the program has 15 members, including

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Faculty and Staff Present, Receive Award at Engagement Scholarship Conference

UT attendees (from left) Lisa Davenport, Lola Alapo, Elizabeth Burman, Bob Kronick, and Jenny Retherford.

Five faculty and staff members shared the impact of UT’s work on various communities during a national conference in Omaha, Nebraska, earlier this month. The university also received a national award that recognized a project designed to improve the wellness and disaster readiness of an Appalachian community in Clay County, Kentucky.

Leading Water Resource Expert Jerad Bales to Speak at UT

Jerad Bales

Jerad Bales, one of the world’s leading water resource experts, will address growing concerns and issues related to water availability, challenges, and safety at at 3:30 p.m. Monday, September 26 in Room 410 of the John D. Tickle Engineering Building. The event is free and open to the public.

Longtime Engineering Professor Goodpasture Dies

David Goodpasture

Longtime UT civil engineering professor David W. Goodpasture passed away Wednesday, September 14, at age 77. Goodpasture retired from active teaching at UT in 2004 after thirty-eight years in what is now the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Since that time, he has served as a professor emeritus, bringing his total commitment to UT

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UT, ORNL Study Climate’s Role in Demands Placed on Energy Grid

Joshua Fu

Joshua Fu, a UT professor of civil and environmental engineering, and his colleagues at UT and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are applying a new methodology for predicting the demands that future climate and population changes could place on the nation’s energy grid.

Retiring Burdette Looks Back on His Fifty-Plus Years at UT

Edwin "Ed" Burdette gestures during a celebration honoring his fifty years-plus connection to the University of Tennessee. Burdette first came to UT as a student in the late 1950s and is retiring this summer as true icon of civil engineering, both at UT and internationally.

Germany and Austria were still occupied by Allied forces, Hawaii and Alaska weren’t yet states, and chimpanzees—let alone humans—had not gotten anywhere near space exploration. That was the situation around the world when Edwin “Ed” Burdette came to UT as an undergraduate in the mid-1950s.