Department of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology News

In Memoriam: Kenneth Monty

Kenneth Monty_obit pic

Kenneth James Monty, founding head of the Department of Biochemistry & Cellular and Molecular Biology, passed away May 23. He was 85.

Titan Supercomputer Probes Depths of Biofuel’s Biggest Barrier

atom_biomass_model

Ask a biofuel researcher to name the single greatest technical barrier to cost-effective ethanol, and you’re likely to receive a one-word response: lignin. To better understand exactly how lignin persists, researchers ORNL created one of the largest biomolecular simulations to date using the Titan supercomputer to track and analyze millions of atoms. The research was led by Jeremy Smith, UT Governor’s Chair based in the Department of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology.

Alumnus on Forbes 30 Under 30 List for Health Care

Neel_Madhukar

Forbes magazine has named a UT alumnus to its annual “30 Under 30” list of young people making big strides in their chosen field. Neel Madhukar, a 2013 alumnus in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology, and research partner Kaitlyn Gayvert were recognized for their work using algorithms to learn about cancer genomes.

In the News: Von Arnim Study on Sleep and Cell Growth Connection

Several outlets featured the research of Albrecht von Arnim, which shows that lack of adequate sleep could short-circuit your system and interfere with a fundamental cellular process that drives physical growth, physiological adaptation, and even brain activity.

UT professor teaches Buddhist monks

Knoxville News Sentinel

The Knoxville News Sentinel featured the work of Barry Bruce, professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology, who traveled to India to teach Tibetan monks biology. In 2001, the Dalai Lama’s office along with the Sager Family Foundation and the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives founded the Science for Monks program,

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US Army Award to Further UT Bioenergy Research

Barry Bruce

In faraway places around the world, US soldiers are challenged with carrying out missions despite the lack of access to energy supplies. A UT bioenergy researcher has received funding from the US Department of Defense to help find a solution.