College of Law News

Wall Street Journal Reviews Stucke’s Book Published by Harvard

Maurice Stucke, a professor in the College of Law, recently co-authored a book published by the Harvard University Press. The book, Virtual Competition: The Promise and Perils of the Algorithm-Driven Economy, is available now at bookstores and online booksellers. It has received numerous reviews, including one from The Wall Street Journal (subscription required) and the Yale School of

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Harvard Publishes UT Law Professor’s Book on Online Algorithms

Harvard University Press has published a new book by Professor Maurice Stucke, a University of Tennessee College of Law professor and a former trial attorney with the United States Department of Justice Antitrust Division. The book, Virtual Competition: The Promise and Perils of the Algorithm-Driven Economy, is co-authored by Ariel Ezrachi, a University of Oxford Faculty of

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UT Law Students Argue Cases before US Court of Appeals

Students in the College of Law’s Appellate Litigation Clinic recently traveled to Cincinnati to argue two cases before the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Third-year law students Alexandra Wolff and Trey Neal received the opportunity to argue their cases after nearly a year of intense preparation supported by fellow students Cameron Kapperman, Patrick Morrison, and Sara Ohlman.

Inaugural Lecture Series in African-American History Begins March 10

The life and groundbreaking career of a famed civil rights lawyer who argued and won nine cases before the US Supreme Court is the focus of UT’s inaugural lecture series in African-American history. The Fleming-Morrow Distinguished Lecture in African-American History kicks off at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 10, with a look into the life of Constance Baker Motley, the first black woman appointed to the federal bench.

Going the Extra Mile: College of Law Spotlights Baxter, Long

The role of the state in defining and regulating marriage. The right of birth parents to choose adoptive parents for their children. The legal liability parents might face if they choose not to vaccinate their children and their children make others sick. Those are just a few of the headline-making issues Professor Teri Baxter examines in her research and when she’s teaching her family and privacy law seminar. Alex Long, a professor of law at UT since 2007, teaches and writes about torts, professional responsibility, employment law, and disability law. Long has helped the college develop two of its innovative new programs as a member of the Academic Standards and Curriculum Committee—the Master of Laws (LLM) program and the 3+3 program.