College of Engineering News

Nuclear Engineering Students Awarded Four Scholarships

Four nuclear engineering students were recently awarded scholarships. Alyxandria Wszolek, a sophomore from Madison, Mississippi; Travis Labossiere-Hickman, a junior from Brush Creek, Tennessee; Mikah Rust, a senior from Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Colton Oldham, from Hurricane, West Virginia, were recognized.

Professor’s Research Into Droplets Could Lead to Breakthroughs in Detection, Clean Water

assistant professor Andy Sarles and researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a method to create air-stable water droplet networks that are valuable for applications in biological sensing and membrane research. Photo by Kyle Kuykendall

The ability to pull water out of fog is just one of many possibilities made real by research involving assistant professor Andy Sarles of the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering. The project Sarles took part in—Air-Stable Droplet Interface Bilayers on Oil-Infused Surfaces—was published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

EcoCAR 2 Team Departs for Final Competition in Series

Members of UT's EcoCAR 2 team—made up of students and faculty from the College of Engineering, College of Communication and Information, and College of Business Administration—gather with the vehicle in front of Ayres Hall for its official sendoff to the national competition.

Students and faculty were on hand Friday morning at Ayres Hall to send off the university’s EcoCAR 2 team for its final-round competitions in Milford, Michigan, and Washington, DC, where the cars will be put through a series of tests to determine which one best meets the competition’s goals of reduced emissions and increased fuel economy and safety. The competition will wrap up mid-June.

Czech Mates: College of Engineering Strengthens Ties with University in Prague

UT student Emily Frame rearranges the fuel in the core of a reactor at Czech Technical University in Prague while an instructor oversees and inspects the process.

For many college students, the week after graduation signals an opportunity to travel. For a lucky few, that might even include a trip abroad. For a group of Department of Nuclear Engineering students, it means both a chance to head to Europe and the opportunity of a lifetime. Led by assistant professors Ondrej Chvala and Eric Lukosi, the nine students are in Prague, Czech Republic, spending time with their counterparts at Czech Technical University and even taking a trip to the uranium mine in Roznika.

Bloomberg interviews Chris Cherry on China’s e-bike problems

Bloomberg.com interviewed Chris Cherry, an associate professor in the College of Engineering’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, for its recent story on some of the safety issues plaguing electronic bicycle use in China.

DOE Looks to Dongarra for Input on Computing Advances

Dongarra

The US Department of Energy recently released a report through its Office of Science detailing the top ten research challenges in reaching the level of exascale computing, once again calling on Jack Dongarra for input. Dongarra, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, director of the Innovative Computing Laboratory and one of five National Academy of Engineering members at UT, has long been at the forefront of exascale computing, or computing at roughly a thousand times the capability of recent supercomputers.

DOT Offers Aerospace, Transportation Engineers Chance at Award, Mentoring

Graduate students interested in the public sector of aviation can apply for a shot at a $10,000 award thanks to a program sponsored by the US Department of Transportation and run by the Virginia Space Grant Consortium. The Graduate Research Awards in Public Sector Aviation Issues pairs up to ten winners with faculty mentors to help guide them on transportation projects related to public aviation.

Systers Act: Koessler’s Impact Felt Well Beyond the Classroom

denise-koessler-210

When Denise Koessler receives her doctorate in computer science, it will mark the end of the long road—one that wasn’t always easily traveled. “There were times along the way where I didn’t have a peer in my classes,” said Koessler. “I was on the verge of leaving engineering. There just weren’t many other women.”

Smaller, Flexible Tablets and TVs Possible Thanks in Part to UT Researchers

Researchers from UT recently garnered national attention for their part in a study that could lead to the development of tablets, TVs, and mobile devices the width of a piece of paper. First published in Nature, the article details how researchers have been able to create wires only three atoms wide using an electron beam.