College of Arts and Sciences News

US Army Award to Further UT Bioenergy Research

Barry Bruce

In faraway places around the world, US soldiers are challenged with carrying out missions despite the lack of access to energy supplies. A UT bioenergy researcher has received funding from the US Department of Defense to help find a solution.

World Cup Fever: Study Shows Group Fervor Stems from Shared Experiences

The 2014 World Cup has captured the attention of billions of viewers around the globe. New research from UT suggests that it is the shared attention that makes these games so emotionally compelling. Assistant Professor Garriy Shteynberg and Associate Professor Jeff Larsen from the Department of Psychology conducted the study, which showed that emotional events are more intense when viewed simultaneously with other group members.

Time: Squid Protein: Our Best Defense Against Chemical Weapons?

Time logo

Time wrote about a recent study by UT and ORNL researchers, published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry, that focuses on the engineering of enzymes produced in the bodies of squid that may be effective in breaking down nerve gasses and other deadly chemical weapons. The team aspires to create a prophylactic drug from these enzymes that will mitigate their harmful effects on humans, but first they must modify the enzymes to ensure that the human body won’t destroy them first.

History Channel’s Henry Rollins Films on Campus

The History Channel’s Ten Things You Don’t Know About show was on campus over the weekend filming an upcoming episode that will feature UT’s The Papers of Andrew Jackson staff. The show will air on a yet-to-be-announced date in August. History Professor Dan Feller and Research Associate Professor Tom Coens participated in the shoot. The show features punk rock icon Henry Rollins as its host, looks at interesting “twists and tidbits behind the historical tales, figures, and places you only thought you knew.”

Cross-Country Science: UT Faculty Mentor Inner-City New Jersey Youth

MXS-Students-TNT

When faculty members Karen Lloyd and Andrew Steen saw an opportunity to introduce a group of inner-city New Jersey high school students to science, they made it happen. Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, and her husband, Steen, an assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences, just completed their second summer program with students and teachers from Malcolm X Shabazz High School in Newark.