College of Arts and Sciences News

History Professor to Appear on PBS’s American Experience

PBS_logo

Be sure to catch Ernest Freeberg, head of the history department, at 9:00 p.m. Tuesday on PBS’s American Experience. Freeberg was interviewed about Thomas Edison. In the show he profiles the inventor whose achievements include a long-lasting incandescent light bulb.

Professor Uses Plantations to Examine Race in America

WBIR-TV

WBIR-TV interviewed Derek Alderman about his new research project. Alderman, head of the university’s geography department, has received $62,000 from the National Science Foundation to study how the representation of Southern slavery at tourism sites is changing. The research will use plantations to understand ongoing debates about race relations, racism, and white supremacy within the

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UT professor shows how cities honor MLK through roads

WBIR-TV

Research by Derek Alderman, head of the department of geography, was featured by WBIR-TV. More than forty years after the assassination of the biggest leader of the civil rights movement, Martin Luther King, Jr., there are places named to honor his legacy around the country. Alderman studies this phenomenon and talked about what it says

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How Bats Can Help And Hurt You

npr

Gary McCracken, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was a guest on the NPR radio show “On Point with Tom Ashbrook.”  On the call-in show, he discussed bats, Ebola, and bat conservation. McCracken is one of the nation’s leading bat experts. His research focuses on animal behavior and interactions with their environments. His current work

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Professor Uses Plantations to Examine Race in America

slavecabins

As the nation pauses to recognize civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. next Monday, a UT professor is reflecting on the country’s racial history in a different way—by examining plantations.

Telling Stories in a Tennessee Coal Town

nytimes

Professor Rob Heller is featured in The New York Times for his photography class, which has turned into a twenty-two-year project documenting the town of LaFollette, Tennessee. There wasn’t much of a photography program when Heller arrived at the university. A few of his students became professional photographers, but he worked hard to teach them how to see and tell stories.