Baker Center News

UT Launches Radiochemistry Center; Seeks to Improve Global Security

What if a nuclear bomb were detonated in one of America’s most populated cities? Just as at a crime scene, the officials need to find the culprit. Currently, the process of analyzing weapons debris to understand the performance or design of the device is painstakingly slow. But new research to be conducted at UT seeks to improve radiochemistry and nuclear forensics to enhance global security.

Alum to Report Energy Assessment Findings

Highlights from the Global Energy Assessment, an analysis of energy challenges, opportunities, and strategies worldwide, will be the subject of a free talk sponsored by the Baker Center Energy and Environmental Policy Program on Wednesday, July 17. The presentation, “Energy Pathways for Sustainable Development: Insights from the Global Energy Assessment,” begins at 5:00 p.m. in the Baker Center Toyota Auditorium.

Baker Scholars Researched Politics, Energy, Education, Health

Some recent graduates and seniors were recently awarded Baker Scholar medallions for completing the program sponsored by the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy. Baker Scholars are selected via a competitive application and interview process. They propose a research project, which they complete over the course of an academic year under the mentorship of a faculty member or community professional.

UT Releases Policy Brief on Selling TVA

The Baker Center has released a policy brief summarizing factors the federal government should consider while making its decision on whether or not to privatize the Tennessee Valley Authority. In his proposed fiscal year 2014 budget, President Barack Obama suggested the federal government consider selling TVA, a corporation created and owned by the federal government since 1933 that provides electricity to nine million people in seven Southeastern states.

Electric Vehicles to be Displayed May 1-3 at Baker Center

Electric vehicles will be on display May 1 through 3 at the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy while a conference is under way for industry professionals, government agencies, and communities to discuss planning for the growing electric-drive vehicle market. The display, which is free and open to the public, will be on the plaza in front of the Baker Center. Cars are on loan from the Tennessee Valley Authority and GM.

Baker Center Releases White Paper on Base-Load Electricity

UT’s Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public has released a white paper examining the difficult choices that utilities and public policymakers face as they weigh alternatives to coal-fired power plants. The paper—entitled “Base-load Electricity from Natural Gas and Nuclear Power: The Role of Federal and State Policy”—is based on a symposium held at the Baker Center in September 2012.

Baker Center to Host Panel on Transportation Issues

A panel of transportation experts and economists will meet on Wednesday, April 17, to discuss “Taxes, Green Vehicles, and the Death of Tennessee Transportation.” The panel discussion will be from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. in the Toyota Auditorium in the Baker Center. It is free and open to the public. The discussion will be moderated by Baker Scholars Eric Dixon, senior in philosophy, and Caleb Williford, senior in logistics.

Solar Summit to Explore Past and Future of Solar Power in Tennessee

A UT group is partnering with the US Department of Energy and statewide leaders to explore the growing field of solar energy. UT’s SunShot Initiative Rooftop Solar Challenge is sponsoring the Tennessee Solar Summit in Chattanooga on Wednesday and Thursday, April 10 and 11. The goal of the conference is to educate attendees about the past and future of solar energy in Tennessee.

What’s Your Big Idea?—Matt Murray

Faculty, staff, students, and alumni are sharing the big ideas that make a difference in their world. Matt Murray, director of the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy, speaks about the big idea of the Baker Center’s Distinguished Lecture Series which kicks off for this year on April 3 with a talk by U.S. Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan.