Research News

Marco Institute to Host Symposium on Reconceiving Pre-Modern Spaces

Diane Favro

Reconceiving Pre-Modern Spaces is the topic of the eleventh annual Marco Symposium to be hosted by UT’s Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies March 6 through 8. The symposium will feature scholars from various disciplines exploring ways in which pre-modern peoples conceived of space—as a physical reality, philosophical idea, and topic of artistic expression.

Former Pakistan Ambassador to Give Baker Center’s Ashe Lecture

Cameron-Munter

Former US Ambassador to Pakistan Cameron Munter will be on campus Wednesday, March 5, to deliver the semiannual Ashe Lecture sponsored by the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy. Munter’s talk, “Beyond 2014: American Relations with Pakistan,” begins at 5:30 p.m. in the center’s Toyota Auditorium. It is free and open to the public.

Researcher Discusses Florida’s Past and Future Flooding at Science Forum

Don Goldstein, paleontology researcher, will present “How Can Florida’s Geological Past Help Us Prepare for the Future?” on Friday during this week’s Science Forum. The Science Forum is a weekly brown-bag lunch series that allows professors and area scientists to discuss their research with the general public in a conversational presentation. The presentation begins at noon in Room C-D of Thompson-Boling Arena.

UT Part of $140 Million White House Advanced Manufacturing Initiative

UT will be part of a national effort, announced today by President Barack Obama, which could lead to more fuel-efficient cars and decreased costs for ships and aircraft. Suresh Babu, UT–Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair for Advanced Manufacturing, and a team of faculty, will help lead UT’s research effort in the $140 million Detroit-based institute, called the Lightweight and Modern Metals Manufacturing Innovation, or LM3I—one of two institutes announced today.

Expert to Discuss Sleep and the Role of the Internal Clock at Science Forum

Theresa Lee

Theresa M. Lee, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of psychology, will present “Tick Tock: Sleep Across the Lifespan and the Role of the Internal Clock” on Friday during this week’s Science Forum. The presentation begins at noon in Room C-D of Thompson-Boling Arena. Attendees can bring lunch or purchase it at the arena.

Researchers Use Kraken to Understand Weather and Climate

NOAA-winter-storm

Severe weather raises questions about the phenomena that cause it. The answer to all questions is atmospheric conditions. The atmosphere consists of varying layers of gases or fluid structures. Researchers at the National Institute for Computational Sciences are using the supercomputing power of UT’s Kraken to model how the structures interact to help prepare accurate weather forecasts and climate predictions.

Bioenergy Expert Named Governor’s Chair

art-ragauskas

Arthur Ragauskas, an authority in bioenergy, has been named the fifteenth UT–Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair. He will serve as Governor’s Chair for Biorefining, based in UT’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering with a complementary appointment in the UT Institute of Agriculture’s Department of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries. He begins on June 1.

Study Finds Crocodiles Climb Trees

An American alligator perches on a tree branch in Pearl River Delta, Mississippi. Photo credit: Kristine Gingras with permission.

When most people envision crocodiles, they think of them waddling on the ground or wading in water—not climbing trees. However, a UT study has found that the reptiles can climb trees as far as the crowns. Vladimir Dinets, a research assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, is the first to thoroughly study the tree-climbing and -basking behavior.

NOvA experiment sees first long-distance neutrinos

Scientists, including a group of UT faculty and students, on the world’s longest-distance neutrino experiment have announced that they have seen their first neutrinos. Neutrinos are abundant in nature, but they very rarely interact with other matter. Studying them could yield crucial information about the early moments of the universe.

Engineering Professor Named to National Academy of Engineering

George-Pharr

George Pharr, Chancellor’s Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Joint Faculty Scientist in the Materials Science and Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been named to the National Academy of Engineering. He becomes the fifth NAE member in UT’s College of Engineering.