Research News

Tennessee Gets a Place at the Table with Newest Element: Tennessine


One of the newest members of the periodic table will likely have a familiar sound to it, even if the spelling might be a bit off: Tennessine. Proposed as a nod to researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and UT who helped confirm its existence, element 117 would be only the second to be named for a state. Since the name Tennessee has its origins in the name of the Cherokee village of Tanasi, it also becomes the first element with Native American roots.

NIMBioS Study: Constructing Shale Gas Sites

NIMBioS_Shale Gas

A new study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) finds that developing shale gas wells that have less impact on the environment, at least at the surface, is not as costly as presumed.

Industry Experts Gather to Discuss Clean Energy Technology


About 150 representatives from universities, industry, and federal agencies, along with elected officials, attended Monday’s Southeast Regional Energy Innovation Workshop in Chattanooga, a forum to advance clean energy technology innovation in the region.

UT Patents Help Prevent Everything from Nuclear Disaster to Onion Milkshakes


UT patents have helped improve everything from rechargeable batteries to the taste of dairy products. For example, UT–Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair for Global Nuclear Security Howard Hall, Nuclear Engineering Professor Steven Skutnik, and nuclear engineering student Michael Willis developed and patented a mobile device that can successfully detect sources of nuclear radiation. Take a look at our list of some of the notable contributions of UT researchers.