Research News

Castaway Doubts: Jantz to Review Evidence of Amelia Earhart Theory

Legendary American pilot Amelia Earhart may not have perished in a plane crash as many have long assumed. A group of researchers believe she died as a castaway on a remote island, and Richard Jantz, professor emeritus of anthropology and director emeritus of UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center, is helping to provide the scientific evidence to back up that claim.

NIMBioS Study: Male Pipefish Pregnancy, It’s Complicated

NIMBioS

In the upside-down world of the pipefish, sexual selection appears to work in reverse, with flashy females battling for males who bear the pregnancy and carry their young to term in their brood pouch. But new research from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) shows even more factors appear to play a role in determining mating success.

Holy Batcave! Personal Sighting Leads Dinets to New Data on Spectral Bat

Spectral bats, also called false vampire bats for their imposing size—a wingspan of over three feet—are the largest bats in the Americas and typically roost in trees in lowland forests. Vladimir Dinets, UT research assistant professor of psychology, has discovered evidence that the species also can live in caves and is more adaptable than previously thought, thanks to personal observation and information gleaned from social media accounts of tourists.

Student Tests HoloLens for NASA, Gets Closer Look at Mars Surface

Every day, Rachel Kronyak walks around the surface of the planet Mars, examining a rock or getting a closer look at a butte framing the horizon. A doctoral student in geology at UT, Kronyak is among a small set of research scientists worldwide testing the use of an augmented reality headset to see how it can help NASA determine whether Mars could support life.