Research News

Dongarra Calls for Renewed Focus on Research into High-end Math

Dongarra

The Department of Energy recently released a report co-chaired by UT Distinguished Professor Jack Dongarra in which he stresses the importance of prioritizing research into high-end mathematics to help keep the United States on the cutting edge of computing.

Distinguished Scientist Awarded Prestigious Geosciences Award

hatcher

Distinguished Scientist Bob Hatcher has been awarded the 2014 Marcus Milling Legendary Geoscientist Medal. The award makes Hatcher the only recipient of the three most prestigious medals in his field. The award is presented to a geoscientist who has demonstrated a long history of scientific achievement and exceptional service to the geoscience profession. Hatcher is also the recipient of the American Geosciences Institute’s 2006 Ian Campbell Medal and the Geological Society of America’s 2006 Penrose Medal.

UT Professor Tapped to Lead National STEM Education Effort

Lou Gross

Part of a national effort to advance science, technology, engineering, and mathematics undergraduate education is being directed by a UT professor. Three five-day National Science Foundation Ideas Labs —one for biology, one for engineering, and one for geosciences—are being held this month through April 4 in the Washington, D.C., area. Louis Gross, director of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT, will serve as director of the Biology Ideas Lab.

UT Receives $4.9 Million USDA Grant for Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs

Sarah Colby

A UT 4-H Extension initiative aimed at empowering college students to create obesity prevention programs for their peers and high school students has received a $4.9 million grant from the US Department of Agriculture. “Get Fruved” is the brain child of Sarah Colby, an assistant professor of nutrition. It is a 4-H social marketing and environmental change initiative that harnesses the power of peer-to-peer interaction in an effort to get children, adolescents, and college students to eat more fruits and vegetables and adopt healthy lifestyles.

Flight Instruction to Gas Hydrates: Mic/Nite Highlights Faculty Research

mic-nite

Participants can get a whirlwind education on a variety of topics at Mic/Nite, where eleven UT faculty members will take turns making short presentations about their work. This semester’s Mic/Nite will be held on Thursday, March 13, at the Relix Variety Theatre, 1208 North Central Avenue. The event will begin at 5:30 p.m. with a social hour, including a cash bar and free pizza. Presentations will begin at 6:30 p.m. and conclude around 8:30 p.m. Door prizes will be awarded throughout the evening.

UT, ORNL Part of Breakthrough Reducing Size of LEDs

University of Washington scientists have built the thinnest-known LED that can be used as a source of light energy in electronics, thanks in part to a breakthrough by University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers. The LED is based off of two-dimensional, flexible semiconductors, making it possible to stack or use in much smaller and more diverse applications than current technology allows.

Higher Ed Engagement Expert to Speak on March 13

KerryAnn-O'Meara-210

UT’s Office of Research and Engagement is hosting a national expert on academic reward systems for engaged scholarship. KerryAnn O’Meara, associate professor of higher education at the University of Maryland, will present “Rewarding Engaged Scholarship in Promotion and Tenure: Strategies for Action” at 1:00 p.m., Thursday, March 13, at the university.

Supercomputer Research Sheds Light on the Death of Stars

Supernovae exhibit the most-energetic explosions, dispersing elements that make life possible into the universe. However, the energy source for the violent death of these massive stars is not known. Researchers using UT’s Kraken supercomputer have created three-dimensional simulations that have made great strides in uncovering the source.

Saving the “Less Glamorous Wildlife” at Science Forum

MarcySouza

Marcy J. Souza, assistant professor of biomedical and diagnostic sciences, will present “Epidemics of Less Glamorous Wildlife: What Can We Do to Stop Them?” on Friday during this week’s Science Forum. The Science Forum is a weekly brown-bag lunch series that allows professors and area scientists to discuss their research with the general public in a conversational presentation. The presentation begins at noon in Room C-D of Thompson-Boling Arena. Attendees can bring lunch or purchase it at the arena.

Research for Rural Appalachia Provides Winter Weather Tips

Students and faculty of the College of Nursing and the College of Architecture and Design are addressing rural Appalachia’s wellness and disaster planning through the UT Appalachia Community Health and Disaster Readiness Project. Funded by a grant from the US Health Resources and Services Administration, the project is researching the needs of Clay County, Kentucky, an impoverished area in Appalachia.