Research News

QuickSod Wins $30,000 in the Tennessee Venture Challenge

Pictured from left to right: David Millhorn, UT Executive Vice President and UTRF President; Richard Magid, UTRF Vice President at the UT Health Science Center; John Sorochan; Ryan Kemp; and Stacey Patterson, Vice President of the UTRF Multi-Disciplinary Office and UT Assistant Vice President and Director of Research Partnerships.

QuickSod swept the first-ever Tennessee Venture Challenge, claiming both the $25,000 overall prize and the $5,000 Crowd Favorite Award at the TVC Pitch Competition held by the UT Research Foundation on Thursday, April 3, at the Foundry in Knoxville. TVC is a business plan competition for the University of Tennessee community. To be eligible for the competition, potential startup companies must be commercializing intellectual property created at a UT campus or institute.

Underwriters Laboratories Supporting College of Engineering Course

David Icove

UT students will soon be able to take part in a first-of-its-kind offering thanks to a new partnership between the College of Engineering and Underwriters Laboratories, known to many for their familiar “UL” mark on a variety of products. A “professor of practice” position, the first so named at UT, is being established with the goal of offering a course in fire engineering forensics that could change the way many things, from appliances to residences, are built.

Expert to Discuss Scientific Computing at Science Forum

Steven Wise, associate professor of mathematics, will present “Simulations for Solutions: Solving Problems Through Scientific Computing” on Friday, April 4, at this week’s Science Forum. The weekly brown-bag lunch series allows professors and area scientists to discuss their research with the general public in a conversational presentation. The presentation begins at noon in Room C-D of Thompson-Boling Arena. Attendees can bring lunch or purchase it at the arena.

Wanted: UT’s NIMBioS Needs Scientists and Science Lovers to Analyze Howls

Scientists and citizen scientists are needed to help researchers at UT’s National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis analyze the howls of wolves, coyotes, dogs, and other canid species. NIMBioS brings together researchers from around the world to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to investigate solutions to basic and applied problems in the life sciences. For the Canid Howl Project, volunteers are needed to log in to a website, listen to howls, and plot them on a graph according to specific directions. Volunteers are also needed to donate their own recordings of howls from domestic dogs.

Colleges of Nursing, Engineering Team Up For Health Simulation Lab

The pediatric room at the HITS Lab is nearly indistinguishable from one in a real hospital, right down to working medical equipment. The goal of the project, jointly brought to life by UT's College of Nursing and College of Engineering, is to put students in as real of an environment as possible.

If “practice makes perfect” holds true, medical and assisted living facilities could see a marked improvement thanks to a new center opening on campus. The College of Nursing and College of Engineering teamed together to come up with the HITS—Health Information Technology and Simulation—Lab, creating spaces identical to a variety of care facilities, complete with actors and manikins serving as patients.

Impact of Arctic Warming Discussed at Science Forum

Stan Wullschleger, project director of Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will present “Arctic Alaska: Wild, Wonderful, and Warming” on Friday at this week’s Science Forum. The weekly brown-bag lunch series allows professors and area scientists to discuss their research with the general public in a conversational presentation. The presentation begins at noon in Room C-D of Thompson-Boling Arena. Attendees can bring lunch or purchase it at the arena.

UT Study Explains New Twist in Group Cooperation

High-rank individuals bully their group-mates to get what they want, but their contribution is key to success in conflict with other groups, according to a new study.

A joint study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and the University of Oxford sheds new light on the evolutionary roots of group cooperation. Researchers say that leaders in group-living species may bully their own to get what they want, but they also bully outsiders for the overall betterment of their own group.

Landscape Architecture Professor Receives Research Fellowship

Brad-Collett-210

Brad Collett, an assistant professor of landscape architecture and plant sciences, has received a research fellowship to develop performance evaluation methods for regional landscape projects. Collett was recently named a 2014 research fellow of the Case Study Investigation Program of the Landscape Architecture Foundation.

Dongarra Calls for Renewed Focus on Research into High-end Math

Dongarra

The Department of Energy recently released a report co-chaired by UT Distinguished Professor Jack Dongarra in which he stresses the importance of prioritizing research into high-end mathematics to help keep the United States on the cutting edge of computing.

Distinguished Scientist Awarded Prestigious Geosciences Award

hatcher

Distinguished Scientist Bob Hatcher has been awarded the 2014 Marcus Milling Legendary Geoscientist Medal. The award makes Hatcher the only recipient of the three most prestigious medals in his field. The award is presented to a geoscientist who has demonstrated a long history of scientific achievement and exceptional service to the geoscience profession. Hatcher is also the recipient of the American Geosciences Institute’s 2006 Ian Campbell Medal and the Geological Society of America’s 2006 Penrose Medal.