Research News

Archaeological Project to Document Battle of Fort Sanders

Captain Orlando Poe’s 1864 map: Topographical Map of the Approaches and Defenses of Knoxville, Tennessee. Secretary of War, Office of Chief of Engineers, United States Army. Library of Congress, American Memory Collection.

Before Fort Sanders was a densely populated neighborhood and restaurant and retail hub, it was known for the bitter clash between Confederate and Union soldiers with the South unsuccessfully trying to siege Knoxville. An effort by researchers at UT Knoxville will make sure this important piece of history does not forever fade into the metropolis.

Center Receives $20,000 for Construction Safety Research

A UT center dedicated to construction safety research to reduce injuries and fatalities has received $20,000 to further its work. The UT Construction Industry Research and Policy Center recently received the gift from Amerisure Insurance Company. The center is based in the College of Business Administration. Amerisure provides workers’ compensation and general liability insurance for many construction contractors.

NICS Supercomputer Helps Recreate Universe’s Evolution

This composite image from the Illustris simulation is centered on the most massive galaxy cluster existing today. Photo courtesy of Illustris Collaboration.

An international team of researchers used resources at UT’s National Institute for Computational Sciences to develop components that would serve as the basis for “Illustris,” the most ambitious simulation of galaxy formation ever done. Illustris allows one to journey back and see in high detail our universe twelve million years after the Big Bang and then watch the cosmos evolve over a period of 13.8 billion years.

Trees: Nature’s Water Filter? UT Study Hopes to Prove So

Jon Hathaway

For their ideas in answering a challenge issued by the US Department of Agriculture, a team lead by UT was recently awarded a federal grant of more than $200,000. The project, “Storm Water Goes Green: Investigating the Benefit and Health of Urban Trees in Green Infrastructure Installations,” is a multidisciplinary effort coordinated with North Carolina State University to study the impact of trees on storm water management.

Study Predicts Ranavirus as Potential New Culprit in Amphibian Extinctions

Wood frog tadpole hemorrhage from a die-off in Brunswick, Maine, in which it is estimated more than 200,000 tadpoles died in less than twenty-four hours due to ranavirus. Photo credit: Nathaniel Wheelwright

Amphibian declines and extinctions around the world have been linked to an emerging fungal disease called chytridiomycosis, but new research from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and the Center for Wildlife Health at UT shows that another pathogen, ranavirus, may also contribute.

World Cup Fever: Study Shows Group Fervor Stems from Shared Experiences

The 2014 World Cup has captured the attention of billions of viewers around the globe. New research from UT suggests that it is the shared attention that makes these games so emotionally compelling. Assistant Professor Garriy Shteynberg and Associate Professor Jeff Larsen from the Department of Psychology conducted the study, which showed that emotional events are more intense when viewed simultaneously with other group members.

UT, NIMBioS Research Sheds Light on Marine Viruses Role in Phosphorus Cycle

A study on marine viruses and their implication for marine biogeochemical cycles by a group of UT- and NIMBioS-associated researchers holds promise for further understanding the quantitative role that marine viruses play in the storage and recycling of dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus.