Research News

Professor Awarded for Prehistoric Rock Art Research

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Jan Simek has spent decades trekking for miles in complete darkness, contorting his body to fit around rocks, and navigating down muddy and stony slopes. The UT anthropology professor’s work has paid off in the form of big discoveries—and now a big award.

UT Humanities Center Lecture to Focus on Famous Philosopher, Moral Theory

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For centuries, philosophers have studied why people do the things that they do, with many basing their studies on Immanuel Kant’s moral theory. Karl Ameriks, a professor at the University of Notre Dame, will talk about morality and autonomy on November 21 when he gives the next Humanities Center Distinguished Lecture at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The event begins at 3:30 p.m. in Room 1210 in McClung Tower.

UT’s Final Pregame Showcase of the Season Goes Behind-the-Scenes

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Curious about how an actor gets into character? Kathleen Buckley, associate professor of theatre, will provide a behind-the-scenes look at how actors break down a script at this week’s final Pregame Showcase before the Vols take on the Missouri Tigers.

UT Mic/Nite Highlights Faculty Research from All Colleges

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Eleven UT faculty members will present their research—ranging from George Washington’s political leadership fail to interactive art projects using a five-foot opossum—in seven minutes or less at this fall’s Mic/Nite on Wednesday, November 12, at the Relix Variety Theatre.

UT Hosts Talk about Sultan Saladin

The Marco Institute Eleventh Annual Riggsby Lecture on Medieval Mediterranean History and Culture will feature Jonathan Phillips, professor of crusading history at Royal Holloway, University of London. He will discuss the life and legend of the iconic figure of the Sultan Saladin. The event is at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 20, in the Lindsay Young Auditorium in John C. Hodges Library.

UT, ORNL Team Up in Possible Spintronics Advancement

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The study of the properties of boundaries between different materials—something that could one day change the world of electronics—is getting a boost from research being done by scientists in UT’s College of Engineering and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.