Press Releases News

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Hires More Than Sixty Engineering Interns

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For more than seven decades, UT and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have forged special connections in a number of key areas, perhaps none stronger than the personnel that the two share. That particular bond was on display recently when members of UT’s Office of Professional Practice visited the facilities at ORNL, meeting more than sixty engineering students involved in summer internships at the lab.

Social Work Associate Director to Participate in White House Summit June 23

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JoAnna Cheatham, associate director of the Office of Research and Public Service in the College of Social Work, will share the university’s successes in uplifting and supporting the state’s families during a White House summit in Washington, DC, next week. President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama are expected to attend the White House Summit on Working Families, a one-day, invitation-only meeting on Monday, June 23.

Clarence Brown Theatre Receives $10,000 Grant from NY Foundation

A foundation connected to the operators of several Broadway theaters has given a $10,000 grant to the Clarence Brown Theatre. The theater was among a select group of recipients nationwide to receive grants from the New York-based Shubert Foundation. The foundation provides general operating support to not-for-profit professional resident theaters, dance companies, and arts-related organizations to help support and nurture their operations.

Hines Honored by American Society for Engineering Education

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The American Society for Engineering Education has named Wes Hines, head of the Department of Nuclear Engineering, the Glenn Murphy Award winner for 2014. The award, named for one of the pioneering leaders in nuclear engineering at the collegiate level over a four-decade career at Iowa State, is one of the society’s top honors.

College of Engineering Taking Part in White House Maker Faire

Responding to President Barack Obama’s call to empower America’s students and entrepreneurs to invent the future, the College of Engineering is participating in today’s National Day of Making, held in conjunction with the first White House Maker Faire.

Cross-Country Science: UT Faculty Mentor Inner-City New Jersey Youth

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When faculty members Karen Lloyd and Andrew Steen saw an opportunity to introduce a group of inner-city New Jersey high school students to science, they made it happen. Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, and her husband, Steen, an assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences, just completed their second summer program with students and teachers from Malcolm X Shabazz High School in Newark.

UT, ORNL Scientists’ Discoveries Could Help Neutralize Chemical Weapons

Nerve agent sarin bound to bioscavenger enzyme.

Researchers at UT are a step closer to creating a prophylactic drug that would neutralize the deadly effects of the chemical weapons used in Syria and elsewhere. Jeremy Smith, UT-ORNL Governor’s Chair and an expert in computational biology, is part of the team that is trying to engineer enzymes—called bioscavengers—so they work more efficiently against chemical weapons.

II-VI Foundation’s Support of College of Engineering Nears $700,000

From left to right, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science students Lakshmi Gopi Reddy, Zhiqiang Wang, and Zheyu Zhang, talk to Richard Hopkins and John Spitznagel of the II-VI Foundation.

A multiyear series of projects in the College of Engineering has been extended again for the 2014­–2015 cycle through a grant provided by the II-VI Foundation, which recently signed its third annually reviewable three-year grant to UT. The foundation was started in 2007 with the mission of “encouraging and enabling students to pursue a career in engineering, science and/or mathematics while maintaining a standard of excellence in that pursuit.”

Materials Camp Offers Students Chance to Take on Investigator’s Role

Whodunnit? Or rather, how’d they do it? That will be the question students will be trying to answer next week when the Department of Materials Science and Engineering welcomes budding detectives to its annual Materials Camp. Reading like an episode of TV’s “CSI,” the camp will give high school students a chance to solve various clues to the identity of an unknown perpetrator based on the use of a wide array of techniques and tools used by materials scientists.