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UT Libraries Acquires First-Edition Works of Phillis Wheatley and Black Hawk

Black Hawk's Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk.

UT Libraries has purchased first editions of two historically significant works—a book of poems by slave Phillis Wheatley and the autobiography of Black Hawk, a Sauk chief who waged war on the United States in 1832. Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, published in 1773, was the first published book by an African-American woman. Black Hawk’s Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk, published in 1833, was transcribed and translated into English from the testimony of the Sauk chief.

Professor’s Research Into Droplets Could Lead to Breakthroughs in Detection, Clean Water

assistant professor Andy Sarles and researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a method to create air-stable water droplet networks that are valuable for applications in biological sensing and membrane research. Photo by Kyle Kuykendall

The ability to pull water out of fog is just one of many possibilities made real by research involving assistant professor Andy Sarles of the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering. The project Sarles took part in—Air-Stable Droplet Interface Bilayers on Oil-Infused Surfaces—was published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

EcoCAR 2 Team Departs for Final Competition in Series

Members of UT's EcoCAR 2 team—made up of students and faculty from the College of Engineering, College of Communication and Information, and College of Business Administration—gather with the vehicle in front of Ayres Hall for its official sendoff to the national competition.

Students and faculty were on hand Friday morning at Ayres Hall to send off the university’s EcoCAR 2 team for its final-round competitions in Milford, Michigan, and Washington, DC, where the cars will be put through a series of tests to determine which one best meets the competition’s goals of reduced emissions and increased fuel economy and safety. The competition will wrap up mid-June.

Czech Mates: College of Engineering Strengthens Ties with University in Prague

UT student Emily Frame rearranges the fuel in the core of a reactor at Czech Technical University in Prague while an instructor oversees and inspects the process.

For many college students, the week after graduation signals an opportunity to travel. For a lucky few, that might even include a trip abroad. For a group of Department of Nuclear Engineering students, it means both a chance to head to Europe and the opportunity of a lifetime. Led by assistant professors Ondrej Chvala and Eric Lukosi, the nine students are in Prague, Czech Republic, spending time with their counterparts at Czech Technical University and even taking a trip to the uranium mine in Roznika.

Students, Faculty to Continue Design-Build Projects in Haiti During May Trip

Students and faculty from the College of Architecture and Design head to Haiti next week to continue work on design-build projects, including a guidebook that will address the urgent need for adequate building standards in the country. The book, LIFEHouse, will emphasize the lesser-known relationship between housing design and disease prevention. The UT Haiti Project team will be in the country May 29 to June 1.

UT Pilot Program Success in MOOC Technology Leads to Continued State Investment

One year into a two-year pilot program, UT’s test of a new online learning technology platform has achieved successful outcomes that have resulted in additional state funding. Launched in May 2013, the pilot program uses technology developed by Coursera and edX, national innovators in massive open online courses, or MOOCs. The initiative is a partnership between the UT System and the Tennessee Board of Regents and is funded by a $1 million appropriation from the state of Tennessee for online innovation projects in connection with Governor Haslam’s “Drive to 55″ campaign.

UT Wins 2014 IANA Supply Chain Case Competition

From left, professor John Bell, Corey Patton, Xiaofan Wang, Heidi Faust, Andrew Currey, and professor Diane Mollenkopf

A team of UT supply chain students has won a national professional organization’s case competition. The team took first place in the Sixth Annual Intermodal Association of North America Logistics and Supply Chain Management Case Competition, which was hosted by the University of North Florida this spring.

Black-Pierce Award Recognizes Law Student’s Pro Bono, Public Interest Work

Carl Pierce, left, looks on as Jerry Black presents the Black-Pierce Award to Brooke Burke.

Law Professors Jerry Black and Carl Pierce retired this summer and, in their honor, an award was established to recognize a third-year law student who is active in pro bono and public interest work and intent on pursuing a career in the field. The 2014 award was presented to recent graduate Brooke Boyd.

Clarence Brown Theatre Honored for Production of Whipping Man

Whipping_Man_Award

The East Tennessee Historical Society has recognized UT’s Clarence Brown Theatre for its production of The Whipping Man, a haunting Civil War-era play that tackles difficult issues and the region’s history. The theater received the Award of Distinction this month from the historical society for its adaptation of the play.

DOE Looks to Dongarra for Input on Computing Advances

Dongarra

The US Department of Energy recently released a report through its Office of Science detailing the top ten research challenges in reaching the level of exascale computing, once again calling on Jack Dongarra for input. Dongarra, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, director of the Innovative Computing Laboratory and one of five National Academy of Engineering members at UT, has long been at the forefront of exascale computing, or computing at roughly a thousand times the capability of recent supercomputers.