Press Releases News

College of Engineering, ORNL Team Up For Manufacturing Day

The strong link between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and UT will be on display Friday, as the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL welcomes UT students and faculty from the College of Engineering.

Tennessee Traditions on Display during Homecoming

Homecoming

The university will celebrate Homecoming with an in-state football match-up against the UT Chattanooga Mocs at 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 11, in Neyland Stadium. This year’s Homecoming theme is “Tennessee Traditions.” The campus will host a variety of activities this week filled with traditions for students, alumni, and fans to enjoy leading up to the game. The annual Homecoming parade will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The parade will begin at Fiji Island beside Fraternity Park and will travel east on Volunteer Boulevard.

UT Awarded $1.2 Million for Traffic Safety Project by CDC

The nighttime safety of drivers and passengers on Tennessee’s highways could soon be greatly improved thanks to a new research project through the Center for Transportation Research. The high number of injuries and deaths from traffic incidents prompted agencies such as the World Health Organization and the United Nations to recognize their epidemic proportion.

UT Pregame Showcase Focuses on Methodism and Eighteenth-Century Theater

misty-anderson

Misty Anderson, an English and theatre professor, will be speaking at this week’s Pregame Showcase on “Methodism and Eighteenth-Century Theatre.” This week’s showcase will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, October 4, two hours before the Vols’ home game against the Florida Gators.

Tooth Serves as Evidence of 220 Million-Year-old Attack

Reconstruction of the interaction of large land predators (rauisuchid) and aquatic predator (phytosaur) about 210 million years ago based on research by a joint team of University of Tennessee and Virginia Tech researchers. Christopher Hayes, a freshman at Virginia Tech, composed the drawing.

At the beginning of the age of dinosaurs, gigantic reptiles—distant relatives of modern crocodiles—ruled the earth. Some lived on land and others in water and it was thought they didn’t much interact. But a tooth found by a UT researcher in the thigh of one of these ancient animals is challenging this belief.