In The News

Mentions of the University of Tennessee in external media outlets.

McKanders Questions Trump’s Immigration Plan

Karla McKanders, associate professor of law and director of the UT Law Immigration Clinic, spoke to WBIR on August 21 about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s immigration reform plan, which includes ending birthright citizenship of children born to undocumented immigrants. Trump uses the controversial term “anchor babies” to describe these children.

Social Work’s Trauma Certification Program Profiled on WBIR

Becky Bolen, professor of social work, was interviewed by John Becker of WBIR for the station’s Service and Sacrifice series. Bolen teaches in a College of Social Work program that trains social workers to help clients deal with mental health issues. Special elective courses for military and veterans’ needs are available. Stephanie Pilkay, a PhD student in the program, discussed how her family history of service led her to be interested in helping veterans get better care in the wake of traumatic events.

Go Knoxville Features Something Old, Something New Exhibit

Go Knoxville, the News Sentinel events guide, features the Ewing Gallery of Art and Architecture’s exhibit showing art from its permanent collection. Something Old, Something New opened August 24. Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, Walker Evans and Andy Warhol are among the more well-known artists whose works are in the exhibit of about 200 items.

UT Pro2Serve Math Contest In the News

Knoxville News Sentinel

Hundreds of Tennessee high school students will descend on UT this fall and put their mathematics skills to the test during this year’s UT Pro2Serve math competition. They’ll also vie for academic scholarships to UT. The News Sentinel featured the contest in this story. Oak Ridge Today also featured the news in this story.  

NPR: If These Bones Could Talk: The Stories Human Skeletons Can Tell

National Public Radio featured the Bass Donated Skeletal Collection and Dawnie Steadman, director of UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center, in this story. The donated collection contains 1,200 skeletons; it’s a draw for anthropologists, detectives and demographers who come to UT to learn how to read these bones.