Experts News

Eclipse 2017: What You Need to Know About Safety

T minus 18 days. On Monday, August 21, a total solar eclipse—when the disk of the moon completely covers the sun—will be visible in the United States along a path from central Oregon through Tennessee and on to South Carolina.

Alderman to Study Role of Geography, Geospatial Intelligence During Civil Rights Era

During the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, activist groups used geography and geospatial intelligence—collecting geographic information and understanding its potential to effect change—to identify protest sites and plan protests. Derek Alderman, a UT professor of geography, has received a three-year $373,000 National Science Foundation grant to explore those geospatial tactics and determine what can be learned about patterns of racial inequality.

Gross Named Fellow of Society for Mathematical Biology

Louis J. Gross has been named a Fellow in the inaugural class of Fellows of the Society for Mathematical Biology. A distinguished UT professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and mathematics, Gross is also the founding and current director of the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) and director of UT’s Institute for Environmental Modeling.

Community Invited to Prepare for Total Eclipse at UT’s Solar Sun Day July 23

Next month, one of the most amazing celestial sights will pass through East Tennessee. The community is invited to attend UT’s Solar Sun Day to prepare for viewing the total eclipse. The event will be held 3 to 4:30 p.m. this Sunday, July 23, on the roof of the Nielsen Physics Building, 1408 Circle Drive.

UT’s Engel Co-Investigator on Grant Funded Through Oil Spill Penalties

A UT earth and planetary sciences professor is co-principal investigator on a project that will study how practices to restore coastal marshes and lands are impacting marsh food webs. The project recently received a $2 million grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s RESTORE Science Program. NOAA disbursed a total of $16.7 million to fund various research projects from penalties paid by parties responsible for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.