Arts & Sciences News

Study Offers Clues to How Plants Evolved to Cope with Cold

Researchers at UT have found new clues to how plants evolved to withstand wintry weather. The study suggests that many plants acquired characteristics that helped them thrive in colder climates—such as dying back to the roots in winter—long before they first encountered freezing.

Physics Research Finds a Cooling Mechanism in Neutron Stars

When it comes to neutron stars, there really is more going on beneath the surface than you might suspect. Associate Physics Professor William R. (Raph) Hix and his colleagues have recently found a layer inside the crust of these stars that actually cools them down instead of heating them up, challenging common scientific perceptions.

Public Writing Course Project Made a Difference in the Community

Students in one UT English class spent the semester learning a lot more than grammar and punctuation. This semester, English lecturer Erin Smith challenged her English 255 students to practice their public writing skills by running fund-raising campaigns for local charities. “I wanted my students to have an opportunity to learn the importance of their writing skills in the real world,” Smith said.

Tom Cervone Returns to UT as Managing Director of Professional MBA Program

tom-cervone-210

Tom Cervone has returned to UT as managing director of the Professional Master of Business Administration program. Cervone is a 2010 graduate of the program, which is based in the College of Business Administration. Since graduation, he has been serving as a leadership development coach for the program.

Professor Recalls Chance Meeting with Mandela

Catherine Higgs

The recent passing of former South African President Nelson Mandela caused one UT professor to recall her chance meeting with him. Catherine Higgs, professor of history and vice chair of Africana studies, met Mandela in the Johannesburg airport in February 1991, a year after he was released after serving twenty-seven years in jail for protesting against the apartheid state.

UT’s Latest Volume of Jackson Papers Exposes “Most Lurid Year” in Presidency

Andrew Jackson

A woman with a dubious reputation. Presidential cabinet members at each other’s throats. A president with a conspiracy theory. It’s not a fictional story of political intrigue. It’s real-life drama—detailed through the correspondence chronicled in the ninth volume of The Papers of Andrew Jackson, recently published by the University of Tennessee Press.