Arts & Sciences News

Expert to Discuss Sleep and the Role of the Internal Clock at Science Forum

Theresa Lee

Theresa M. Lee, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of psychology, will present “Tick Tock: Sleep Across the Lifespan and the Role of the Internal Clock” on Friday during this week’s Science Forum. The presentation begins at noon in Room C-D of Thompson-Boling Arena. Attendees can bring lunch or purchase it at the arena.

Geography Symposium Offers Variety of Topics

From the global food crisis to electric bicycles, the Department of Geography’s inaugural research symposium has something for the geographer in everyone. Titled Mapping Outside the Lines: Geography as a Nexus for Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Research, the symposium begins Friday, February 21, and ends the following afternoon, Saturday, February 22. The symposium is free and open to the public.

Author to Speak on “Dark Green” Nature Religion at UT

BronTaylor

Author and professor Bron Taylor will discuss how a multifaceted trend of “dark green” religion is becoming a global movement at UT’s fourth annual David L. Dungan Memorial Lecture on Thursday, February 20. Taylor’s lecture, “Spirituality After Darwin: ‘Dark Green’ Nature Religion as Global Religious Movement,” is presented by the Issues Committee and co-sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies.

UT to Host Jazz Festival for Area Middle, High School Bands February 22

East Tennessee middle and high school band students can sharpen their music skills and learn from top jazz professionals at UT’s first annual Jazz Festival on Saturday, February 22. Participating bands will have the opportunity to perform before clinicians who will then provide feedback to the students. Guest clinicians are members of the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra and the UT jazz faculty.

Study Finds Crocodiles Climb Trees

An American alligator perches on a tree branch in Pearl River Delta, Mississippi. Photo credit: Kristine Gingras with permission.

When most people envision crocodiles, they think of them waddling on the ground or wading in water—not climbing trees. However, a UT study has found that the reptiles can climb trees as far as the crowns. Vladimir Dinets, a research assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, is the first to thoroughly study the tree-climbing and -basking behavior.

NOvA experiment sees first long-distance neutrinos

Scientists, including a group of UT faculty and students, on the world’s longest-distance neutrino experiment have announced that they have seen their first neutrinos. Neutrinos are abundant in nature, but they very rarely interact with other matter. Studying them could yield crucial information about the early moments of the universe.