Arts & Sciences News

Chicago Sun Times: Harjo Follows Native American Roots

Joy Harjo, professor and chair of excellence in the Department of English, is the recipient of the 2017 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize–the prestigious award that honors a living U.S. poet for outstanding lifetime achievement. The Chicago Sun Times featured Harjo and praised her for following her Native American roots. Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Harjo, 66,

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Michigan Outlets Feature Study on Toledo Water Crisis

Public officials and scientists need a different way to monitor toxins from algae blooms so they can be detected quicker and before they spread through the water supply, according to a new UT study about the 2014 Toledo crisis that affected Monroe County.

News Sentinel: Grissino-Mayer Continues to Warn Others of Future Wildfires

Henri Grissino-Mayer, James R. Cox professor in the Department of Geography and an expert in using tree rings to reconstruct past climates, has warned of megafires consuming communities along the boundaries of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Grissino-Mayer was recently featured in the Knoxville News Sentinel, as he continues to warn city officials that the Smoky Mountains are 520,000 acres of kindling.

NIMBioS: Mathematical Biology Tackles Destructive Plant Virus

Plant diseases pose a serious threat to global food security, especially in developing countries, where millions of people depend on consuming what they harvest. In sub-Saharan Africa, one plant disease in particular – maize lethal necrosis – is ravaging one of the region’s preferred crops for food, feed and income. A team of researchers at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS), based at UT, has used mathematical modeling to better understand the dynamics of the disease and how to manage it.

Eclipse 2017: Everything You Need to Know

On Monday, August 21, a total solar eclipse—when the disk of the moon completely covers the sun—will be visible in the United States along a path that is 2,500 miles long and 70 miles wide, from central Oregon through Tennessee and on to South Carolina.

The Conversation: Why Taking Down Memorials is Only a First Step

Derek Alderman, a professor in the Department of Geography, recently co-authored an article published by the Conversation with Josh Inwood, a former UT professor who is now a faculty member at Pennsylvania State University. The article expanded on a recent decision to remove several Confederate monuments in the city of New Orleans.

Language and World Business Program Provides Global Opportunities for Students

The Language and World Business program provides students interested in studying language, culture, and business with a curriculum designed to prepare them for careers in today’s global market and economy. It is the most popular major in the Department of Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures.

Summer Exhibition Features UT Printmaking Faculty

Stone, Mesh and Metal: Prints by Beauvais Lyons, Althea Murphy-Price and Koichi Yamamoto is the featured exhibition in the Clayton Center for the Arts’ Blackberry Farm Gallery through September 1.