Arts & Sciences News

UT Researchers Use Computers for Drug Research

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UT researchers are using supercomputing to simulate the interactions of drug compounds and proteins in the body. The computers allow them to rapidly collect and analyze data which could make medicine cheaper, find new uses for existing drugs, and enhance the understanding of a drug’s potential side effects.

Students Training for Computing Event

Some very computer-savvy UT and area high school students are training with UT faculty mentors for the Student Cluster Competition, which is part of the SC14 conference, the world’s largest high-performance computing event.

CSURE Interns at UT to Learn High-Performance Computing

Ten college students from around the U.S. are at UT for the Computational Science for Undergraduate Research Experiences, a summer internship program that provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to begin using high-performance computing.

UT’s Bandwidth Hits 100 Gigabits Per Second Milestone

For some, getting on the Internet can be a blast. Now, thanks to the Bandwidth for Leadership in Advancing Science and Technology project—known as BLAST—it can also be faster for computer users at UT. A recent upgrade makes it possible for UT users to make use of Internet speeds up to 100 gigabits per second. Most research institutions have Internet speeds around 10 gigabits per second.

History Channel’s Henry Rollins Films on Campus

The History Channel’s Ten Things You Don’t Know About show was on campus over the weekend filming an upcoming episode that will feature UT’s The Papers of Andrew Jackson staff. The show will air on a yet-to-be-announced date in August. History Professor Dan Feller and Research Associate Professor Tom Coens participated in the shoot. The show features punk rock icon Henry Rollins as its host, looks at interesting “twists and tidbits behind the historical tales, figures, and places you only thought you knew.”

Cross-Country Science: UT Faculty Mentor Inner-City New Jersey Youth

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When faculty members Karen Lloyd and Andrew Steen saw an opportunity to introduce a group of inner-city New Jersey high school students to science, they made it happen. Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, and her husband, Steen, an assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences, just completed their second summer program with students and teachers from Malcolm X Shabazz High School in Newark.