Posts By: Whitney Heins

CNN, Reuters, NBC News, and Chicago Tribune: Ancient Tennessee cave paintings show deep thinking by natives

The work of anthropology professor Jan Simek has been featured in multiple news outlets, including CNN. Simek and colleagues from the University of the South, the US Geological Survey, and Mississippi State University spent about a decade and a half documenting rock art of the Cumberland Plateau, which slices across Tennessee between Chattanooga and Nashville. They found common themes, colors, and depictions across the ninety-four sites, fifty of them underground.

Students Conduct Research at UT to Find Rare Birds in Smokies

Undergraduates from across the country and their research mentors, David Buehler at UT and Arik Kershenbaum at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS), will try to find rare birds in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park as a part of a project to help protect and maintain species’ biodiversity in the park.

Program Gives High School Students Inside Look into Engineering

Cameron Rios and Christine Garcia, ninth grade participants, design Solar Ovens for CURENT Engineering Design in 2012.

Thirty-two rising ninth-grade students from Tennessee and surrounding states will get an up-close look at the challenges and marvels of the engineering field from engineering faculty and professionals during the College of Engineering’s Engineering Volunteers for Ninth Graders program. The program takes place from June 23 to 28 on campus.

Summer Computational Science Experience for Undergraduates Begins

A ten-week summer project designed to provide promising undergraduate students experience in the research applications of computational science—and, in the process, become energized and encouraged about furthering their educations—is now underway at the Joint Institute for Computational Sciences.

NIMBioS Study Finds Biological Fitness Trumps Other Traits in Mating Game

The brighter the colors, the more popular the butterfly will be with the females. A new study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis finds that a female’s mating decisions are largely based on traits that reflect fitness or those that help males perform well under the local ecological conditions.

Small Animal Oncology Service Holds Design Contest

The small animal oncology service at the College of Veterinary Medicine is asking for your help. They are designing new material and a web page to educate the general public about veterinary oncology and have come up with the tagline “Teaming up to sniff out cancer.” Now, they need a great image to go with it and are calling on the campus community to submit designs.

Discovery News: Cave Art Shows Prehistoric Southern Living

Discovery News featured the work of Jan Simek, president emeritus and a distinguished professor of science in the Department of Anthropology, which is published in this month’s edition of Antiquity. Simek’s research finds that the oldest and most widespread collection of prehistoric cave and rock art in the United States has been found in and around Tennessee. The art provides intriguing clues about what life was like for Native American societies more than 6,000 years ago.

Middle School Girls Take an Adventure in STEM at CURENT

CURENT hosted its second annual Adventures in STEM summer camp which brought twenty middle school girls from all around the state to UT. The week was filled with science, technology, mathematics, and engineering projects.

Three Students Selected for Summer Research Experience at National Institute

Three UT students have been selected for the highly competitive Research Experience for Undergraduates program currently underway at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis taking place on campus. Samuel Estes, Brittany Hale, and Jacob Lambert, are among nineteen students from acrross the country participating in the eight-week, research-intensive program.