Posts By: Whitney Heins

The New York Times: Algorithm Can Identify Dolphin Whistles

Work by researchers at National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at UT was featured in The New York Times. The work discovered a computer algorithm that is used to identify songs can also identify the signature whistles of bottlenose dolphins. Just as humans sound slightly different each time they sing a given song, a

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NPR: Science On Shaky Ground As Automatic Budget Cutbacks Drag On

National Public Radio featured the sequestration effects on research by Governor’s Chair for Molecular Biophysics Jeremy Smith and graduate student Sally Ellingson who use Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s supercomputer, Titan. Grant agencies like the National Science Foundation are only funding roughly 1 in 5 of the proposals it receives now, reported NPR. Smith said he’s

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WVLT-TV: Flipper on Line 1? UT researchers closer to figuring out how dolphins talk

WVLT-TV featured research at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis which has developed a method to help decipher dolphin communications. The method focuses more on changes in pitch than frequency, so scientists could assign hundreds of signature whistles to over twenty individual dolphins. To read the whole story, visit WVLT’s website.  

WUOT: Mass Grave Project As Part Of Human Rights Initiative

WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper interviewed anthropology graduate student Katie Corcoran and Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Devin White about a project they are working on at the Forensic Anthropology Center. The project studies how mass graves change over time to assist to detection. To listen to the story, visit WUOT’s website.

WBIR-TV: Magic of Chemistry Show featuring Dr. Al Hazari and Company

Chemistry lecturer Al Hazari visited WBIR-TV students to do some of his famous chemistry demonstrations which are featured in his annual Magic of Chemistry show. Hazari has used chemistry to perform “magic tricks” in his show for 23 years. This year’s show—free and open to kids and adults—was held on Tuesday, October 22. To see

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Supercomputer Work Makes Stride in Biofuels Research

Cellulase enzymes found in nature from sources such as wood-degrading fungi or in cows’ stomach compartments form one of the key catalysts for breaking down plant biomass to make biofuels. But, they remain quite expensive. Compute allocations from the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) have made a breakthrough possible that could have big cost implications.

CURENT Visits Two Local Schools for Family Engineering Night

UT’s Engineering Research Center, CURENT, recently held two Family Engineering Nights at Lake City Elementary School and Green Magnet Academy. The events connected about 400 students and their families to engineering exhibits which included solar cars, paper helicopters and homemade circuits.

UT Physics Team Involved in Nobel Prize-winning Higgs Boson Research

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the Nobel Prize in physics to Peter Higgs and Francois Englert for their research on what has come to be called the Higgs field, which gives elementary particles mass. The UT High Energy Physics group has been part of the hunt for the Higgs boson since 2006, working with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.