Posts By: Whitney Heins

The New York Times: Coldblooded Does Not Mean Stupid

According to a New York Times article, humans have no exclusive claim on intelligence. Across the animal kingdom, all sorts of creatures have performed impressive intellectual feats. ordon Burghardt, a psychology professor, was interviewed for the piece. “Reptiles don’t really have great press,” said Burghardt. “Certainly in the past, people didn’t really think too much

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Two Professors Receive UTRF Maturation Funding

This year the UT Research Foundation is awarding $120,000 to eight inventors. Two professors are recipients of the maturation awards. Steve Ripp, research assistant professor in the Center for Environmental Biotechnology, received support for developing bioluminescent zebrafish as a tool for high-throughput drug screening. Ziling (Ben) Xue, professor in chemistry, received an award for a novel chemical sensor with high sensitivity toward biodiesel contaminant in jet fuel and diesel.

All Things D: The World’s Most Powerful Supercomputer Is Still in China

An internationally-recognized list launched by Jack Dongarra, distinguished professor of computer science, is receiving international coverage including the The Wall Street Journal‘s All Things D site. The latest edition of the TOP500 list which ranks the most powerful supercomputers is released this week, coinciding with a conference being held in Denver. According to the article.

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In Memoriam: Maureen Nalle

Maureen Nalle, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing, passed away on Friday at the age of sixty-one. Her teaching focused on the college’s continuing education, teaching, and community service. She also served in the US Army where she retired with the rank of major.

Yahoo!: Top 5 Supplements that Melt Fat

A Yahoo! article about supplements that help you lose fat featured research by professor emeritus of nutrition, Michael Zemel. According to the article, Zemel’s research shows when levels of D are low, levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) rise. Higher than normal levels of PTH trigger a series of reactions that eventually lead to fat cells

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UT Team Heads to Supercomputing Competition

A team of four UT students along with a student from Hardin Valley Academy and Oak Ridge High School are heading to Denver to compete in the SC!13’s international student supercomputing cluster competition. The competition is designed to introduce the next generation of students to the high powered computing community.

The Chronicle of Higher Education: A Diversity Effort That Goes Back Decades

The Chronicle of Higher Education featured the College of Engineering’s success in diversity programs. According to the article, the college’s Office of Diversity Programs, which just celebrated the fortieth anniversary of such programs at the college, has seen the graduation of more than 900 minority students, including fifteen master’s and Ph.D. students.

WUOT: Spirits and Graves

In WUOT’s The Method series, Christine Jessel speaks to Jamie Adcock, professor emeritus in chemistry, about the science behind moonshine. To listen to the full story, visit WUOT’s website.

Solar Decathlon House Continues to Yield Data

Students and faculty hope their innovations from last year’s Department of Energy Solar Decathlon benefit teams gearing up for the 2013 contest. The U.S. Department of Energy’s biannual international competition challenges teams of students to design and build low- to zero-energy homes, learning about solar power and sustainable design along the way.