Posts By: Lola Alapo

Dolly Talks to New York Times About UT Course Bearing Her Name

Dolly Parton’s TV movie “Christmas of Many Colors: Circle of Love,” received an Emmy nomination for best TV movie this summer. In an interview with the New York Times, she discussed her reaction to the honor, her family, and the UT course bearing her name. The course Dolly’s America, taught by Lynn Sacco, associate professor of

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Science Pubs Highlight Bat Research of Post Doc Leppanen

Christy Leppanen, a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, recently published a review that describes the scope in which invasive species threaten bats. The review summarizes the threats according to four categories: predation, disease, competition, and indirect interactions. Leppanen and her co-author identified threats of 37 invasive species to

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Science Mag Uses Efremenko Neutrino Discovery As Cover Story

Science magazine featured as its cover story the neutrino discovery of a team of scientists including Yuri Efremenko, a professor of physics. After more than a year of operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the COHERENT experiment, using the world’s smallest neutrino detector, found a big fingerprint of the elusive, electrically neutral particles that interact only weakly

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New Scientist: Magic Mushroom Effects on Insects

The New Scientist published an article about the effects of hallucinogenic mushrooms and their insect-repellent properties.  The work, conducted at the Ohio State, incorporated research from the lab of P. Brandon Matheny, associate professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and the research of former student Hailee Korotkin who graduated with a master of

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Reed Publishes Chapter in New York Times-reviewed Book

Julie Reed, associate professor of history, published a chapter on the Trail of Tears in the book Marked, Unmarked, Remembered: A Geography of American Memory, a collection of essays that support the photos of Andrew Lichtenstein. The New York Times reviewed the book. Read the story online.

Chronicle of Higher Ed Quotes Alderman Work on Public Memory and Slavery

The Chronicle of Higher Education featured a story in which a researcher doggedly maps forgotten corners of slave history, including Detroit’s role in the Underground Railroad and its past in which many Detroiters held many people in bondage between the mid-1700s and early 1800s. The story highlights the scholarship of Derek Alderman, UT professor of geography, about public memory relating to how those slave tales are told.

Community Celebrates Three Decades of UT Forensic Anthropology

Community members got a firsthand look at the work of UT forensic anthropologists during an open house on Sunday, October 1. More than 250 visitors—including children, families of donors, and pre-donors who will give their body to the center upon their death—took part in the event, which was hosted by the UT Forensic Anthropology Center.

In Memoriam: Lawrence “Larry” Taylor

Lawrence “Larry” Taylor, a faculty member who was founder and director of UT’s Planetary Geosciences Institute, passed away September 18. He was 79. A prolific researcher, Taylor had a career at UT that spanned 46 years. He was one of the geoscientists based at the Johnson Space Center during Apollo 17, NASA’s last manned mission to the moon, in December 1972.

Grissino-Mayer Talks to News Sentinel Following Firewise Meeting

Henri Grissino Mayer, a professor of geography and an expert who uses tree rings to determine wildfire patterns, spoke to the Knoxville News Sentinel following Firewise, a Pigeon Forge meeting aimed at helping residents be engaged in the process of minimizing the potential of a wildfire.