CCI Names New Distinguished Professor of Media Management and Law

Stuart Brotman will start work on January 1, 2016, as the inaugural Herb Howard Distinguished Professor of Media Management and Law in the College of Communication and Information.

stuart brotmanThe distinguished professorship was created with a $1 million gift from alumnus Larry Patrick in honor of longtime professor and administrator Herb Howard. It is the largest single cash gift in the college’s history.

Brotman has extensive experience as a global executive, management consultant, international communications and media lawyer, university educator, and government policymaker.

Prior to coming to UT, he taught entertainment and media law at Harvard and was a faculty member in the Law School’s Institute for Global Law and Policy and the Business School’s executive education program. He also was an annual visiting lecturer in entertainment and media law at Stanford Law School as part of a Harvard-Stanford faculty exchange program he co-directed. He previously taught at Tufts University and has taught and worked in Qatar, India, Germany, Finland, Hungary, Israel, and Australia.

Brotman also is a nonresident senior fellow in the Governance Studies Program of the Center for Technology Innovation at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC.

He has served on the US Department of State Advisory Committee on International Communications and Information Policy, as an arbitrator and mediator of the World Intellectual Property Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, and on the Media Institute’s Global Internet Freedom Advisory Council.

During the Carter administration, Brotman served as special assistant to the president’s principal communications policy advisor and as chief of staff at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.

Brotman has written more than 300 articles and reviews on business, technology, policy, history, negotiation, law, regulation, and international trade that have appeared in scholarly and professional publications, a variety of law reviews, and the Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, the Christian Science Monitor, Des Moines Register, the Indianapolis Star, the Journal of Commerce, the New York Times, US News & World Report, and the Washington Post.

He is the editor of The Telecommunications Deregulation Sourcebook, a popular reference volume covering the broadcasting, cable television, and telephone industries, and of Telephone Company and Cable Television Competition, a pioneering anthology dealing with technical, economic, and regulatory aspects of broadband networks. He is the author of Broadcasters Can Negotiate Anything, a management education book for radio and television executives, and of Communications Law and Practice, the leading comprehensive treatise covering domestic and international common carrier and electronic mass media regulation, now in its thirty-seventh edition.

CONTACT:

Amy Blakely (865-974-5034, ablakely@utk.edu)