College of Architecture and Design Presents Suggestions for New Approach to Parking on Campus

KNOXVILLE — The College of Architecture and Design at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, on Friday will host its third in a series of one-day workshops about the aesthetics of campus and considerations that should be taken into account in future development.

Members of the College of Architecture and Design, the campus community and local landscape design professionals will develop and present ideas for “Parking under a Campus Park,” a suggestion for a new parking facility — with rooftop green park space — near Neyland Stadium and the University Center. The campus community is invited to a presentation of findings and results from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Art + Architecture Building Room 103.

Members of the College of Architecture and Design, particularly those involved in the new Landscape Architecture Program, and several area professionals will make suggestions for other possible uses for this facility in addition to parking, such as classroom space and other purposes that can contribute to the creation of a memorable and active campus space. Friday’s workshop will be led by Bill Bruce, an alumnus of the university and president of Community Concepts in Atlanta.

This forum is part of a series of workshops hosted by the College of Architecture and Design and the Landscape Architecture Program entitled “A Campus for the Class of 2030.” A Campus for the Class of 2030 is a plan to develop a greener, healthier campus with public spaces that support a high quality of civic and collegiate life.

The workshop series was prompted by an independent study that found that a campus’ environment and appearance have strong influence on a student’s decision to attend that institution. As an urban campus, UT Knoxville faces many challenges, including the gradual encroachment of parking lots on spaces that many alumni fondly remember as green lawns. Members of the College of Architecture and Design and area professionals were inspired to get involved in campus development because of this study and a desire to contribute to the university.

The results of these discussions are shared with members of the UT and Knoxville communities who are invested in improving the quality of the campus environment, including the UT Knoxville campus beautification committee, key university administrators and other groups influential in the environmental design of campus.

This is the first workshop to include students from the landscape architecture inaugural class. Previous discussions have explored visions of streetscapes for Volunteer and Lake Loudoun boulevards that integrate form guidelines for adjacent structures, landscape, low-impact transit (bike and pedestrian), parking and open spaces.

Contact:

Tracy Walker Moir-McClean, (865) 974-8172, moirmccl@utk.edu

Kristi Hintz, (865) 974-3993, khintz@utk.edu