Former KPD Deputy Chief to Manage UT’s National Forensic Science Institute

KNOXVILLE — Knoxville Police Department Deputy Chief Don Green is taking his leadership and instruction expertise to one of the nation’s foremost training programs for crime scene investigators.

Don Green
Don Green
Green will join the University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation Center (LEIC) as program manager of the National Forensic Science Institute (NFSI) on April 1.

Green has been with the KPD since 1979 and last served as division commander for the department’s Criminal Investigative Division. In previous assignments, Green dealt with school safety and security planning, weapons of mass destruction and homeland security, leadership training and special projects.

“Don’s diverse background in law enforcement instruction and management make him well-prepared and qualified to lead the National Forensic Science Institute,” said Daniel Baker, LEIC executive director. “His knowledge of school safety, homeland security and leadership projects will be an asset to many programs at LEIC.”

Green has a strong history with the university already. He has provided instruction and technical assistance for LEIC for several years, and he has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in criminal justice from UT.

Green also is a graduate of the 204th session of the FBI National Academy and the 28th session of the Senior Management Institute for Police.

At LEIC, Green will oversee the National Forensic Academy (NFA), a 10-week, hands-on training program for crime scene investigators (CSIs).

The NFA was recognized in 2007 by the International Association of Chiefs of Police with the first August Vollmer Excellence in Forensic Science Award. Funded primarily by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the NFA has trained more than 300 CSIs from 44 states and the District of Columbia in evidence identification, collection and preservation.

“Don’s extensive law enforcement experience, particularly his work with criminal investigations and in managing crime scene investigations, will greatly benefit the advancement of the NFA,” Baker said.

Green is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police, Tennessee Law Enforcement Executive Development Alumni, National Academy Associates and the Police Executive Research Forum. In 2004, he received the President’s Award from the Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police.

Green serves on the Tennessee Governor’s Homeland Security Council and the Prevention Advisory Committee for the National Center on Missing and Exploited Children; he also chairs both the Internet Crime Against Children and Homeland Security Committees for the Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police.


Contacts:

Queena Jones, (865) 974-1533, queena.jones@tennessee.edu